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CHANITE 




JUNE 
-^1951 




c 



Itanlte 



ANNUAL PUBLICATION 
TALMUDICAL ACADEMY 
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 




JUNE 
1951 







1 able of contents 



The Administration 3 

Dedication ^ 

The Elchanite Staff 5 

Faculty 6 

Graduates 8 

Last Will and Testament 2 1 

Hall of Fame 22 

Reminiscing ... A Poem by Reeve Brenner 24 

Senior Annals „ 25 

Autographs 40 

Activities „ 41 

Torah and Life, by Jules Nordlicht „ 54 

Yemenite Jewry , by Zvi Sobel 56 

A Lesson from Experience ... A Poem by Avram Orbach 60 

The Voyage Under the Desks, by Sheldon E. Kornbluth 61 

The Brook ... A Poem by Alan Scher 64 

The Ideal Friendship , by Marvin Blackman 65 

Peace, A Poem by Henry E. Hartman 68 

A Background Study of Psychoanalysis, by Avram Orbach 69 

Advertisements 75 

Scholarship Awards 91 



-g^^^O 




DR. SAMUEL BELKIN 
President 



With abiding faith that you will govern your 
lives by the standard of the Torah and our 
American democracy, and that you will consider 
your education as a means to a greater end— 
towards a concentrated service to G-d and our 
fellow men, we congratulate you, the classes 
of 1951, and wish you well-being and well- 
doing. 

THE ADMINISTRATION 



T~WF njsssc^ 





DR. SHELLEY R. SAPHIRE 
Principal 




RABBI ABRAHAM N. ZUROFF 
Administrator 



MR. SAMUEL LEVINE 
Executive Director 



-THREE- 




Within the pages of this year bool<, from cover 
to cover, can be found the striking story of will power 
and the untiring efforts to attain one goal. With 
the completion of this beautiful journal, the goal of 
the students and of one particular individual, has 
finally been realized. This year, as in the past four 
years, our Elchanite faculty adviser has devoted much 
of his very valuable time to this publication. And 
so with this knowledge, we, the graduating classes 
of 1951, humbly dedicate this Elchanite to our own 
Rabbi Baruch N. Faivelson . . . 



- FOUR - 



mrr 



[ 



Editor-in-Chief Sheldon E. Kornbluth 

Associate Editors: 

Activities Marvin Bashkowitz, Joseph Halbfinger 

Art „ Abraham Orbach, Abraham Bruclcenstein 

Features Aaron Schmerler, Bernard Hoenig 

Photography Morton J . R ichter 

'r 
Business Managers Henry E. Hartman, 

William Kotkes, Bernard Greenbaum, Israel Yavne 

Faculty Advisers: 

Harry Allan 

Robert E. Bassell 

Rabbi Baruch N. Faivelson 

Art Associates Micha Botknecht, 

Gilbert Goidfine, Samuel ZIotnick 

Typists „ Dinah Leviton, Sarah Thaler 



V 




ELCHANITE 



TALMUDICAL ACADEMY 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Faculty 



Shelley R. Saphire Principal 

B. A., College of the City of New York, 1912; 

M. A., Columbia University, 1913; Ph. D., 1920. 
Abraham N. Zuroff Administrator 

B. A., Yeshivah College, 1941; Rabbi, Yeshiva University, 1944; 

M.A., Columbia University, 1948. 
Harry Allan Art 

B.S., Nev^ York University, 1931; M.A., 1933. 
Robert E. Bassell English and Social Studies 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1940; M.A., 1942. 
Isaac J. Cantor Spanish 

B.A., New York University, 1922; 

Professional Diploma, Teachers' College, 1921; 

M.A., Columbia University, 1931. 
Haskel Epstein Mathematics 

M.E., Cornell University, 1922; 

J.D., New York University, 1926. 
Baruch N. Faivelson Hebrew 

B.A., Yeshiva University, 1935; Rabbi, Mirer Yeshiva, 1938; 

M.A., Columbia University Teachers' College, 1947. 
Jacob D. Godin Spanish and French 

M.A., College of the City of New York, 1932 M.S.E., 1933. 
Sidney Gold English and Social Studies 

B.A., College of the City of New York, 1930; 

M.A., Columbia University, 1932. 
Emery Grossman Music 

Certificate of Music, 1930. 
Majer Herskovics Hebrew 

B.A., Jewish College of Czechoslovakia, 1940; 

M.A., Pazmany Peter University, 1944; 

Rabbi, Ungvar Rabbinical School of Czechoslovakia, 1932; 

D.H.L., Yeshiva University, 1950. 
Julius Jacobs Physical Education 

B.A., College of the City of New York, 1929; hA.A. 1935. 
Philip J. Kipust .jcience and Biology 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1950. 
Julius Landowne Biology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1904; 

M.A., New York University, 1912. 
Samuel H. Lebowitz Physics and Chemistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1922; 

M.A., Columbia University, 1926. 
Jechiel Lichtenstein French and Hebrew 

Ph.D., University of Neuchatel, 1933. 
Martin Lilker History and Economics 

B.A., Yeshiva University, 1945; M.A., Columbia University, 1946. 
Joseph Sarachek English 

Ph.D., Columbia University, 1936. 
Alex Shapiro Mathematics 

B. A., Yeshiva University, 1946; Rabbi, Yeshiva University, 1949. 
Joseph B. Strum English 

B.A., College of the City of New York, 1929; 

M.A., New York University, 1931. 
Morris Turetsky Mathematics 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1931; 

M.A., Columbia University, 1922; 

LL.B., St. Lawrence University, 1927. 

Samuel Levine Director 

Dinah Levi ton Secretary 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1948. 
Sarah Thaler Secretary 



- SEVEN - 




-EIGHT- 







Z 

— ^ 
u- 

O 

to 
to 
< 




-NINE- 



£ifi}ji]j]jr£ 



CLASS OF JANUARY, 1951 



>?■* 



^^ 




HERBERT BERGER 

Class Secretary, 7; Hebrew Club Secretary-Treasurer, 1 

Good-natured Herbie is a Boro Park boy and an 
excellent Talmud student. He is going to Yeshi- 
va University where he expects great things to 
conne his way. 

Silence is golden. 




JACOB BRAILOFSKY 

Class President, 4; Office Squad, 5. 

Known to us as "Chusid", Jake comes from little 
Jerusalem (Williamsburg) to preach his religious 
doctrines. He is a Gemorrah major and can be 
seen learning in his spare time. 

All is if I have grace to use it so, grace in my great 
Taskmaster s eyes. 





BERNARD GREENBAUM 

Class President, 8 ; Elchanite Board, 8 ; Class Secretary 
Treasurer, 3, 5,; Charity Collector, 1-3. 

Bernie was always busy with the apparatus in 
the science lab during his stay at T. A. He is 
going to Yeshiva College where he is majoring 
in science. 



■ TEN. 




JOSEPH HALBFINGER 

Elcbaiiile Board, 8; Class Vice President, 2: Library 
Squad, 2; Class President, 4; Class Sanitation Mana- 
ger, 5 ; Service Squad, 6. 

Joe joined our class this past September, when 
he decided to take' the 3I/2 year course. As the 
class' comedian Joe's humor and jest put the 
class in stitches, but gave Mr. Lilker much agony. 

A foolish inconsistency is the hobgoblin of Utile minds. 



^\ 




STANLEY JAFFE 

Elchanite Board, 8; Library Squad, 1,6; Class Secretary- 
Team, 1-8; Class Athletic Manager, 1. 

Stan majored in basketball and on the side did 
art work. He is Central High School's basket- 
ball coach (oh, my!). To be a commercial artist 
or architect is his ideal. 




NORMAN KLEINMAN 

Class Debating Team, 4-8 ; President of Public Speaking 
Club, 5. 

Famous as an orator, Norman preaches and 
quotes the Holy Scriptures quite often. Some- 
day Norman hopes to be a big Rabbi. 

How street his voice, he just lores to talk. 



\U\ 



- ELEVEEN - 



£ifiij})iinp 



^ 

*^^ ^ ^ 




AARON SCHMERLER 

G.O. President, 8; Class Debating Team, 7-8; School 

Debating Team, 8; Class Sanitation Manager, 2,5,7,; 

Class Vice President, 5; Office Squad, 5-7; Service 

Squad, 5-7; School Choir, 3-5; School Chess Team, 1. 

Aaron majored in extracurricular activities as he 

sped to the scene on his bike. He made number 

87 famous in TA. He is going to City College 

where he hopes to become an electrical engineer. 

Though he goeth on his way wee-ping, bearing the 

store of seed, he shall come back with joy bearing bis 

sheaves of success. 







JUDAH SCHWARTZ 

Class President, 1 ; Class Debating Manager, 4 ; School 
Chess Team, 6j; Arista, 6-8; School Debating Team, 
6J. 

Judah seemed to take school as a matter of fact 
and that's the way it came to him. His stupidity 
in History won for him first prize among the 
Yeshivas in the Journal American History Con- 
test. 

In English fudah failed - to get a hundred. 





BERNARD SOBEL 

Office Squad, 4, Sanitation Manager, 5. 

He likes to be called ZVI, and agrees whole- 
heartedly with Burns when the subject is Bro- 
therhood of Man. He will qo to Brooklyn Col- 
lege to increase his knowledge. 

A wan is a man for all that. 



- TWELWE - 




MURRAY STEGER 

Class Vice President, 8; Class Sanltalioii Manger, 4. 

Moishe was the cash collector in the Yeshiva's 
cafeteria, before he was graduated. He hopes 
to own his own restaurant someday. Yeshiva 
College is where he will go. 

S/iU waler runs deep. 




ISRAEL YAVNE 

G. O. Vice President, 8; EJchanite Board, 8; Office 
Squad, 6,1 ; Editor of Kolenii, 1 ; Class Vice President 4. 

This happy-go-lucky fellow was rollbook and 
admit keeper in Rabbi Yogel's class. Through 
his efficient service many a student had an 
admit when one was needed. He expects to 
pursue his studies in Talmud at Yeshiva Uni- 
versity. 

Happiness is the key to success. 



CMh^'ktK SHY 

ISRAEL BASSIUR 

EDMUND CHANOVER 

MELVIN COHEN 

SOLOMON GARBER 

SEYMOUR JAFFE 



JD5J 



• THIRTEEN- 



iimmf. - 





CLASS OF JUNE, 1951 
MARVIN BASHKOWITZ 

Arista Vice-Leader 1, Arista 6,7,8, Class Vice-Presi 
dent 3, Class Secretary 4, Activities Editor of Elchanite 
7,8, Class Debating Team 4,5, Service Squad 7,8, Lib- 
rarian, 7,8, Basketball Team trainer 8. 

Although quiet and studious, "Mathematic" Marv 
has always added to the achievements of our 
class. As our able T. A. Basketball Trainer, 
Marv had always looked forward to training at 
Bentley. With the ambition of teaching Hebrew 
(???) at Central, he will attend T. A. for his 
degree. 
■ — This mathematician can readily be called a "mathe- 
magician". — 




JOSEPH BREZAK 

Arista Secretary 8, Arista 8, Class Athletic Manager 8, 
Class Vice-President 7, Service Squad 7,8, Office 
Squad 7,8, Class Debating Team 7,8. 

Good-naured Joe got through T. A. in his own 
modest way. The famous Brownsville joker 
always added to the color of Rev Yogel's class 
with his versatility in combining Talmud with 
jokes and weight lifting. 

Joe "weighted'' four years to graduate high school. 




ABRAHAM BRUCKENSTEIN 

Arista 8, T. A. Publications 7,8, Class President 3,5, 
(Uptown), Uptown Basketball Team 5,6, Class Vice 
President 4, (Uptown). 

As a recent migrant from Uptown to Brooklyn, 
Dunie has achieved popularity in a short period. 
Using his witty talents, he has driven Mr. Lilker 
batty at times. The famous artist has the dis- 
tinction of always being late to class because of 
his far distance from T. A. (???). 

He drew lots and came "down" lo Brooklyn. 



-FOURTEEN- 




JOEL GREEN 

class Vice-PresideiH 8, Class Athletic Alaiiager 3,4, 
Class Sanitation Manager 1,2, Charity Collector 1,2,3,4, 
School Basketball Team 1-8. 

One half of the famous Green twins, Joel 
always posed the question to the class, 
"Which twin has the Toni?" Voted the best 
natured in the class, this Green hoopster has 
rightly deserved this title. Hoping to be a 
doctor, Joel expects to pre-med at Y. U. this fall. 

Joel has never been "green" in his studies and sports. 




LEON GREEN 

Arista Leader 8, Arista 6,7,8, G.O. Athletic Manager 
3, 7, Student Court 8, T. A. Publications 5, 6, Class 
Athletic Manager 2, Class Vice-President 4, School 
Basketball Team 1-8. 

Disgusted Leible, the T. A. hoopster, finally had 
his ambition realized this season by breaking the 
156 point mark, with a new record of 196 points 
in one season. As a rabid athletic fan, Leible 
holds the distinction of being T. A. Athletic 
Manager twice. He will attend Y. U. this fall, 
where he will endeavor to continue his basket- 
ball career. 
Dribble, dribble, toil and disgust. 



.^^r 




HENRY E. HARTMAN 

Arista 7,8, Student Court 8, Service Squad 6,7, Business 
Manager Elchanite 7,8, Ojjice Squad 7,8, Class Presi- 
dent 7, Class Vice-President 1,6, Class Secretary 5, Lib- 
rarian 3. 

Old Reliable Hank, the famous T. A. office boy, 
has decided to go into partnership with Godfrey 
and the Lipton Tea Company. Rev Yogel has 
promised full cooperation in this venture. Now 
that he is being graduated, the office is pulling 
hairs out to find another "answer to their prob- 
lems", but we all know "T'aint nobody like our 
Hank." 
Oh Henry.'.'.' He's as siieel as they come. 



Ji)5J 



. FIFTEEN ■ 



5LfilJi)J]JT£ 







BERNARD HOENIG 

Arista Leader 7, Arista 6,7,8, G.O. President 8, G.O 
Athletic Manager 5, G.O. Debating Manager 1, Student 
Court 8, Ekhanite Features Editor 7,8, Elchanite Re 
porter 6, Sports Editor of "Star" 6, Class President 2,6, 
Class Debating Manager 1,3, Class Debating Team 
1-5,7, School Debating Team 7,8, School Basketball 
Team 1-8. 

While improving athletic, debating, Arista and 
G. O. activities in T. A., Bernie had the honor of 
breaking the 110 point record, by accumulating 
an amazing 125 points through high school. 
As Debating Champ, he gave Central its first 
defeat. Bernie, the organizer and chief justice 
of our Student Court, after much deliberation, 
made a very wise decision. 
Bernie attended school when nothing else iras on the 
a 



EUGENE HORN 

Class Athletic Manager 5, Class Sanitation Alan age r 1, 

School Basketball Team 5-8. 

As Berle's understudy. Gene, our class comedian, 
has constantly spirited our class with his wonder- 
ful talents. As the famous number 14 star in 
the Ramaz game, he was instrumental in the 
decisive victory. With his loud sportswear, Gene 
has always advocated the changing of T. A.'s 
colors to chartreuse and black. 

Gene is the man xvith hair on his jest. 



RUBIN HUTTLER 

Arista Secretary 8, Arista 6,7,8, Class Sanitation Mana- 
ger 8, Class Debating Manager 6. 

Uncle Ruby, our Talmud scholar, is one of the few 
loyal students of Bungalow Three. As an ardent 
Zionist and Hebraist, Ruby set an outstanding re- 
cord as being one of the quietest and nicest 
fellows in the senior class. 

Me finally made the Bored of Education. 



- SIXTEEN - 






FRED KAHANE 

President of Class 8, Class Athletic Manager 1, Lib- 
rary 4, School Basketball Team 4-8. 

Big, strong, and handsome Freddie, has gained 
the admiration of all the students with his shiny, 
expensive, deluxe Chewy (1935). Freddie at- 
tends school when he is not busy with the fairer 
sex and billiards . . .(?) The class Casanova will 
take his mechanical attributes to T. I. in the fall. 

His car is in first crash condition. 

SHELDON E. KORNBLUTH 

Arista Vice-Leader 8, Arista 6, 7, 8, Secretary of Arista 
6, Editor-in-Chief of Elchanite 7, 8, Secretary of T. A. 
Publications 1, Literary Editor of Elchanite 1, 8, Class 
President 5, Class Debating Manager 5, Class Debating 
Team 1-5, School Debating Team 8, School Chess 
Team 5. 

Shelie, who has a great mind for figures, has 
always led the pace in the scholastic race, by 
excelling in all of his subjects. In the past years 
Shelie has added to the color of school elections 
he has done a great job in grinding out this 
by his "never die" spirit. As our Elchanite "Ed", 
publication. 
To be a T. A. Genius: one percent inspiration: ninety- 
nine percent perspiration. 

WILLIAM KOTKES 

G. O. Athletic Manager 8, Elchanite Business Manager 
7,8, Office Squad 5, T .A. Publications 3,4, Librarian 1,2 
Class Athletic Manager 5, Class Sanitation Manager 6, 
Co-Captain of Basketball Team 7,8, School Basketball 
Team 1-8. 

Handsome Willie finally realized his ambition 
when he was elected T. A. Athletic Manager. He 
proved to be one of the best in T. A.'s history. 
As an idol of the younger students and Marty's 
pal, Willie, the Central Coach, was quite popular 
with his team and its managers. 
He iras a conductor .it the Grand CENTRAL Station. 



\B'5\ 



- SEVENTEEN- 



sifiijiinm 




NORMAN LISS 

Arista 8, Librariati 1, Class Secretary 6, Class Sanitation 
Manager 3, Service Squad 4, Class Debating Manager 7, 
School Debating Team 1-5, 7, 8. 

Serious and hard working, Normie has improved 
from term to term until he finally became a 
member of Arista. As one of Mr. Lilker's loyal 
supporters for Economics, Normie intends to 
tour Israel this summer with his friends Willie, 
Bernie, and Ruby, to study its "economics". 

Normie' s motto: G-d cannot alter the past, but histo- 
rians can! 




JULES NORDLICHT 

Librarian 5, 6, Class Debating Manager 8, Class Deba- 
ting Team 6, 7, 8, School Debating Team 1 . . 

R. W. Emerson has finally found an ardent ad- 
vocate of his non-conformist policy in our "Nu- 
die". Constantly preaching his thesis on the 
coverying of the "pinky", he has proven to be 
quite a philosopher. As one of B'nei Akiva's 
most loyal supporters, Jules will attend Y. U. 
this fall to continue his Talmud studies. 

"Communism in America isn't new," says Nudie, "the 
first American Reds were the Indians. 




ABRAHAM ORBACH 

Art Editor of Elchanite 7, 8,, T.A. Bubltcations Poster 
Committee 4-6, T.A. Publication 5, 6, Artist for T.A. 
"Star' 4, Librarian 2, 5, 6, 8. 

Honest Abe, the Elchanite's Art Editor, has 
proved himself quite a protege of Rembrandt. 
Besides his active participation in the Library, 
Abe has made history by being one of the few 
to take every elective subject. He will go Up- 
town this fall, with the anticipation of painting 
the town red. 

Raphael's paintings require no praise. 



- EIGHTEEN - 




IRWIN PECHMAN 

Ar/s/a 8, Service Squad 8, AUeniale 7, Librurian 5, 7, 8, 
T. A. Publication Tyj)isl 7, 8, Clan Vice-President 5, 
Class Sanitation Squad Manager 7. 

As one of the famous President Street boys, Irwin 
has improved his neighborhood by always 
shoveling snow. (???) The home run king of the 
Lag B'Omer outing is deliberating staying in 
T. A. one more year for another crack at Babe 
Ruth's home run title. 

School has been one long interruption of his daily 
routine. 




MORTON J. RICHTER 

Photography Editor of Elchanite 5-8, T. A. Publications 
Reporter 3, T. A. Publications Typist 1-8, School De- 
bating Team 6, 7, Class Secretary 7, Service Squad 5, 
Basketball Team Trainer 5, 6, 7, Class Debating Team 
2, 3, 4, 7, Technical Editor of "Star" 4. 

Smiling Morty was the only T. A. student to 
ever run a photography business at the same 
time that school was in session. Now that he 
is a full fledged newspaper photog, it can be 
disclosed that Morty got his start publishing 
the international "La Nueva Voz". Strange as 
it seems, Morty still hopes to be a great doctor. 
Taking pictures to Alorty was always a snap. 




i 



HOWARD TREITMAN 

Class Athletic Manager 1, Librarian 4, Class Santation 
Manager 6, Co-Captain of Basketball Team 7, 8, 
Basketball Team of School 3-8. 

Howie, another owner of the famous Chewy 
'35, is known to be a loyal student of Charles 
Atlas. Although he tries to attend school Sun- 
day morning, his "physical" health does not 
allow it. (???) As the co-captain of our T. A. 
team, intramural star, and weight lifting champ, 
Howie was known to be quite an athlete. ) 

Education never interfered with his schooling. 



\'U\ 



-NINETEEN- 



afiiJi]i]jr£ 




AVRAMWEISSMAN 

Class Debating Team 7, 8, Librarian 6. 

Avie, another migrant from Uptown, has proved 
himself quite able in handling Macbeth as well 
as shoe string catching at the Lag B'Omer outing. 
One of the higher students in the senior class 
(6'4") our class Hebraist expects to continue his 
studies at a higher institute: the Yeshiva Uni- 
versity. 

"The last is the most beloved". 



CAMERA SHY 



MORDECAI WEINSTEIN 






- TWENTY - 



5ja0t Will anJi ©pBtamfttt 

As it becomes necessary for the honorable (?) classes of '51 to leave 
the realms of the Talmudical Academy, we, the class members, being fully 
aware of the disastrous loss which befalls our school upon our departure, 
deem it wise to bequeath unto our Alma Mater, lasting and im- 
pressionable gifts, which will recall sweet memories of our worthy class. 
Whereas we, the classes of '51 believing ourselves to be in sound minds (?) 
and sound bodies (due to the magnificent gymnasium), do hereby benevolently 
bequeath the following, not because we are growing old and feel that death 
is near, but because we feel that we no longer have any use for the following 
bequests. 

To Mr. Allan a moustache with a toni. 

To Rabbi Berkowitz a new set of ashtrays. 

To Mr. Cantor a compass and an Indian guide. 

To Rabbi Faivelson a recording of his voice speaking on ads. 

To Mr. Godin another kid to spy the new building. 

To Mr. Grossman a phonograph to install in his car to play records. 

To Mr. Jacobs a softer job. 

To Rabbi Kanotopsky a bar of good humor. 

To Mr. Landowne a drink from the fountain of youth (a schnapsle). 

To Mr. Levine the hope that construction of T. A.'s new building will take 

place soon. 

To Dr. Lichtenstein a new course in chutzpah and a briefcase equipped with 

plumbing. 

To Mr. Lilker a white shirt, tuxedo, AND the hope that he will find a beautiful 

collar. 

To Dr. Sarachek a year's supply of bananas. 

To Rabbi Schussheim a pair of boots and a kosher salami. 

To Rabbi Shapiro all the unsolved Math problems. 

To Mr. Strum we leave the hairs we split in his class. 

To AAr. Turetsky a machine to say keep still and do your woik. 

To Rabbi Zuroff an automatic hand to write admits and a BIG OFFICE. 

To Freddie a loudspeaker to remind the students not to sit on desks. 

To the incoming Elchanite Board we leave all of the debts of the outgoing 

Elchanite Board. 

All else that has not been mentioned we, the departing seniors, take 
along with us, into the cruel, cruel world. 

Executor 

CHARLES FRIEDMAN, DDT, BS, MS. 
SEAL 



-TWENTY-ONE - 




CLASS OF JANUARY, 1951 



Class Artist STANLEY JAFFEE 

Best Natured SEYMOUR JAFFEE 

Class Casanova EDMUND CHANOVER 

Did Most For the School THE ENTIRE CLASS 

Did Most For the Class BERNARD GREENBAUM 

Handsomest MURRAY STEGER 

Class Hebraist ISRAEL YAVNE 

Class Humorist JOSEPH HALBFINGER 

Class Idealist BERNARD SOBEL 

Most Likely to succeed JUDAH SCHWARTZ 

fWost Popular HERBERT BERGER 

Class Orator NORMAN KLEINMAN 

Most Versatile .'. ISRAEL BASSIUR 

Class Thinker AARON SCHMERLER 

Quietest JACOB BRAILOFSKY 

Class Scientist MELVIN COHEN 

Favorite Teachers MR. JOSEPH STRUM, RABBI BARUCH N. FAIVEL50N 







CLASS OF JUNE, 1951 



Most Ambitious ABRAHAM BRUCKENSTEIN 

Class Artist ABRAHAM ORBACH 

Class Athlete MORDECAI WEINSTEIN 

Class Casanova FRED KAHANE 

Class Comedian EUGENE HORN 

Most Courteous I RWI N PECHMAN 

Did Most For the School HENRY HARTMAN 

Best Dressed MORTON RICHTER 

Handsomest WILLIAM KOTKES 

Class Hebraist AVRAM WEISSMAN 

Cla . Historian NORMAN LISS 

Most li-telligent SHELDON KORNBLUTH 

AAost Likely to Succeed MARVIN BASHKOWITZ 

Best Natured JOEL GREEN 

Class Orator JULES NORDLICHT 

Most Popular LEON GREEN 

Pride of the Class BERNARD HOENIG 

Most Versati le JOSEPH BREZAK 

Class Zionist RUBIN HUTILER 

Favorite Teacher MR. MARTIN LILKER 

Favorite Rabbi RABBI H. KANOTOPSKY 



FAME 





By REEVE BRENNER 



When I was a Freshie, 
Open eyed I'd look, 
And study so hard 
Within my book. 

And then, as a Sophomore 
Of haughty height, 
I'd look down at the freshies 
With sheer delight. 

I, then, was a Junior 

Of superior fame; 

No more school books for me, 

You bow to my name. 

And lastly, a Senior, 
From T. A. I'll soon go. 
I've had so much learning, 
Nary a thing I don't know. 

Freshie, Soph, Junior, Senior, 
That was once my way. 
But as of now I am 
A graduate of T. A. 




- TWENTY-FOUR ■ 




'm ;4«tfi^£^ 



Freshmw 




DIARY OF CLASS OF JANUARY, 1951 

We were received in a special room set aside for our freshmean orienta- 
tion by Rabbi Zuroff, Dr. Sapphire and Co. . . . Sent to the office because am told 
am late .... But Rabbi Zuroff, am here on time, bells are early . . . Piracy 
runs the school ragged as we learn "Treasure Island" . . . Small Pox breaks out 
in N. Y. . . . Get vaccinated in lab with T. A. serum . . . Mr. Lilker teaches us 
Hebrew and learns a bit himself . . . The horn blows at 2:30 p. m. every day . . . 
Had a test in Civics . . . One question . . . Tell all you know about the federal, 
state and city government. Use books, if necessary, and crayon if you have no 
pen . . . This is High School? . . . Yavne breaks through ceiling . . . Detective 
Cantor to get to bottom of it ... P. S.— He did . . . Ping-pong room becomes class- 
room . . . Firecrackers set off in school . . . School paints windows "Green" on 
Si". Patrick's Day. 

We learn Spanish songs in Senor's class, and his jokes really make a 
hit . . . "Full well they laughed with counterfeit glee" at all his jokes . . . We 
have to pass the course, don'1 we? . . . Rabbi Moshe Klein wins scholarship 
to Hebrew U . . . Mr. Allan grows mustache . . . Wotta bush! . . . Students 
supply broomstick . . . Class starts daily, weekly, and monthly newspapers . . . 
Marty teaches us math and how to know figures (Math figures). 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JUNE, 1951 

Greetings! The Talmudical Academy High School cordially invites you 
to attend the first day of instruction for this year. Bring $2.50 for Gemorrahs . . . 
So this is IT! It wasn't like this in those pamphlets. Where's that big dome? . . . 
Meet a swell bunch of fellows. Crown Heights, Etz Chaim, Toras Ernes . . . Hum, 
this looks like war . . . Wise guy senior tries to fool a smart freshie like me 
with elevator stuff . . . What do you need one for? A Soph told me the swim- 
ming pool was on the first floor . . . Classes begin . . . Tell me Rabbi Shusheim, 
what was Lou Gehrig's batting average in 1929, from April 23, to July 8, when 
he played for the Bluetail Spinners? . . . The Senor's room is turned inside out. 
Secret Service organized . . . Take your face off and I'll slap your glasses . . . 
Since when does sulphuric acid leak from these fluorescent lights? . . . But 
Senor, how can we learn? It's dangerous . . . Finals, and nobody takes one 
in Spanish . . . Something called "exemptions" . . . G. O. elections in June. 
Little Leible Green dares to run against upper termers, and wins for athletic 
manager . . . What a man! . . . 



- TWENTY-SEVEN - 




Sophomore 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JANUARY, 1951 

Mr. Landowne teaches us Biology ... He tells us that Bio is a subject 
to loin in Goiman or Spinich (Spanish) ... "I can learn Spinich . . . Ha!. Hablamos, 
hablais, hablamos, hatatos, haseidashababas" . . . Mass cut as 87% of school 
goes to Pike Street to say Tehilim . . . Exemption mark upped to 90% . . . Julie 
hears a noise . . . Says, "There's a bold inna tree . . . It's a robin. Spring is 
here . . . Heh, hehl." . . Music teacher blinks at us . . . Bathroom basketball 
players start league . . . Baseball, too . . . Everyone exempt from Bio final . . . 
Bees can buzz while Julie plays golf instead of marking Bio finals . . . 

Mr. Turetsky uses his "Shass"-math sefer with his Lamashals to teach 
us Geometry . . . Class learns to dig ditches as they help to fix sidewalk near 
school . . . School sends ambulance to Israel . . . Landowne says to boy, "You're 
going to fail . . . You're too quiet. Heh!" . . . Result— this boy gets 87% on 
regents . . . "Wha!" . . . "Cannot believe it" ... Dr. Sarachek tells the boys, 
"Do not make noise or else leave the rooommm and go to a salooon" . . Landowne 
says, "When the bell rings I don't give a rap. I leave the class" . . . Then he 
runs down the fire escape . . . 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JUNE, 1951 

Well, we're big sophs now, and can sneer at those little freshies . . . 
Morton J. Richter unanimously elected editor of the Spanish paper, "La Nueva 
Voz" . . . New subject-Bio. . . . Hey, when you go into a shoe store, what do 
you get? Kaynig — Kaynee - Kotkees. Who, Mr. Landowne? ... I don't 
give a rap. . Heh, heh, you git a zeeero . . . BPABBP . . . Pretty easy course. 
3/4 of our class fail first third . . . Well, finals again ... Bio final and average 
mark 100; Music final . . . Write a composition of what you think of the 
music class . . . Three more boys drop out of school ... Lag B'Omer outing 
comes fast. First time together with another school . . . What's the name? Sounded 
like Central . . . We'll be seeing more of them . . . Rabbi Yogel makes speech 
at assembly . . . Students' day in June . . . Bob is brought to trial . . . takes off 
jacket; opens tie and collar . . . Good sport . . . (Aren't we devils!) G. O. 
elections in June again . . . Our class becoming known . . Bernie Hoenig starts 
office holding by being elected athletic manager . . . Regents, and Spanish 4 
again, and then the long awaited vacation . . . (Yawn) . . . 



. TWCNTY-NINE 



NO-SnOKiN^I 




Junior 



-THIRTY. 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JANUARY, 1951 

11 Chem majors . . . Bob gives us 187 Foreign words to memorize . . . 
A la mode or else se me felo . . . Parties and class songs . . . Shaitels and Bows, 
Give Me a School, When I was a Boy, etc., become famous throughout the 
school . . . New fellow joins our class . . . Name is Murray Bomzer . . . Sure is a 
nice fellow . . History midterm is rough as only a few boys pass . . . Class secedes 
from G. O. as we write our Constitution on old treasure map . . . Only in fun. 
We get student's day . . . First in T. A. . . . We win school plaque. 

Class goes into action . . . With many songs and we become full of pep. 
Monkey enjoys bananas . . . We buy Rabbi Faivelson a new fountain pen to 
replace the one that was "misplaced" . . . Israeli maps go on sale as we learn 
Hebrew geography . . . We buy " '50" hats and become opposites of the oppo- 
sites in opposite order . . . Stanley Jaffe gets a zero from Marty for leaving his 
" '50" hat home . . . Spanish six reads newspapers to become cultured . . . We 
pul on a Chanukah satire and as a result Mr. Strum buys a new hat . . . King 
Izzy blows in from Florida . . . We win the plaque again . . . G. O. elections. 
Sixth term makes a clean sweep as Barondes becomes Pres., Rudoff Veep, 
Goldstein Sec. Treas., and Greenfield Ath. Mgr. . . Aaron decides to run next 
term . . . Rudoff, Barondes, Goldstein, Dimont, Heimowitz, Schatz, Bomzer and 
Greenfield make a three and a half course ... Dr. Sarachek gives us checks 
for our work . . . Too bad they look like this-, v . . . 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JUNE, 1951 

Back from vacation . . . fellows still look tired . . . Well, only two more 
years. Choice of courses. Chem or free . . . Chemistry taken at your own 
risk . . . What formula does K9 stand for? (woof, woof) . . . T. A. gets new gym. 
Our English teacher shows how to fall asleep in one 40 minute period . . . 
Boy, those television wrestlers are sooo comical . . . You back there. Pleeze leeve 
the rrroom . . . Yes, rrright now, I say . . . Eugene Horn decides to joke his way 
through the remainder of school . . . (and he does it!) .... Spring term finds 
minor opposition between B. Bassel and Joe H. . . . New English assignments 
a cinch . . . Know 650 words perfectly for tomorrow . . . Say, Senor Godin— 
In Spanish we just don't get homework . . . What? and tests too? . . . 95's sud- 
denly make a quick disappearance in Espanol . . . Morty becomes a pro photo- 
grapher . . . Leible wins again for athletic manager of school . . . Freddy Kahane 
gets 92 on Int. Algebra regents (Man!) ... No three and a half year course for 
us . . . office does not want to mediate . . . wish we had a Dr. Bunche. 



-THIRTY-ONE. 




Senior 



_ THIRTY-TWO - 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JANUARY, 1951 

Several boys take physics and become pulley experts ... So we move 
into the submarine base for Hebrew classes . . . Charlie and Yavne compete 
to see who can make a smaller gyp sheet . . . Mr. Friedman sinks in an overfolw 
can. Physics student becomes weight lifter . . . G.O. elections . . . Seventh term 
wins again . . . Schmerler becomes Pres., Yavne Veep, Chanover Sec. Treas. . . . 
Green, Ath. Mgr. . . . Greenberg, Leiman, Kukoff, decide to graduate in August. 

"Well had the boding tremblers learned to trace the day's disaster in 
his (Sunday) morning face," (to Mr. Lilker) . . . We have a good time while we 
learn English . . . Halbfinger, Cohen, Schwartz, Sobel join our class as they 
make it in 3I/2 years . . . President Schmerler coins the phrase "I table it" as 
the result of the fire at G. O. meeting . . . Cohen uses elbow pipe as free capital 
in Economics . . . Weinstein calls in the plumber . . . Class goes high in Eco. 
marks . . . Nov. 19. 1950 and it is exactly 87 years ago that Lincoln made his 
Gettysburg address . . . We are dubbed "Sirs" by Mr. Lilker as he conducts a 
U. N. meeting in the class in place of Sir Gladwyn Jebb . . . Cohen gets a zero 
for disturbing Izzy from his doodling . . . President Schmerler delivers his 
farewell address . . . Everybody's going to Y. U. (Yavne University) . . . The 
ceilings are fixed . . . We are graduated and the mysterious smell circulating 
in the Hebrew room is gone forever . . . Freshies again! ! I 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JUNE, 1951 

Well, this is what we've been waiting for . . . Shine up those senior 
pins . . . Willie Kotkes becomes Central's coach (basketball) and is elected 
co-captain of T. A. Team with Howie Treitman . . . Seniors go to New Jersey 
on election day — to vote. Huttler becomes famous for tales of a hitchhiker in 
English . . . Can you hear him back there, Treitman? Nah . . . We win SCHOOL 
DEBATING CHAMPIONSHIP and medals . . . G. O. elections . . . Willie elected 
G. O. athletic manager . . . Inevitable presidential race between Leible G. and 
Bernie H. Bernie elected . . . New Hebrew 8 with the Professor . . . Pechmaaan! 
Regents Scholarship ... If the area of a square is .00004 and height 10 feet, 
how long will it take to fill it up with solidified coco-cola? Oh well, eeenie 
meenie minie moe . . . Term goes too fast . . . Prom night (???) . . . Man from 
Jewish Mail comes. Morty is now a Press Photographer, Duni a cartoonist . . . 
And then the long awaited graduation . . .Receive diplomas . . . Shake hands, 
find a lump in your throat and soon thoughts go back to that first day four 
years ago ... It was swell— that surprise; swimming pool; the fellows; the 
volleyball court . . . Yep, it's all over and we're back as freshies again. 



-THIRTY-THREE- 



She 




6R0 



VOL. WNK 



NEW ANTHOLOGY OF POETRY BY 
ISRAEL BASSIUR 

Israel Bassiur, who began as a poet critic in 
T. A., became a writer after being graduated. It 
is said that it took Mr. Bassiur some 80 odd months 
in hermitage to write this book. It was acclaimed 
as one of the best books to appear on the market. 
Sale of this book is going like "Matzohs" Erev 
Pesach. Among some of his works are "To A 
Mouse" and "How to View the World." 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY STARTS FULL SCALE 
RADIO PROGRAMS 

Rabbi Herbert Berger was appointed by the 
President of Yeshiva University to direct the Uni- 
versity radio program called "Faith and Learning", 
which is on the radio six times a week except for 
Saturdays and religious holidays. This program is 
an inspiration for the learning of Torah and has 
succeeded in bringing about a movement of interest 
for the practice of "Halacha". 

Murray Steger recently opened the only large 
kosher cafeteria in New York. The cafeteria has 
two sections which are separated by two different 
entrances; one section for meat and the other for 
dairy. Moishe got his experience m handling the 
T. A. cafeteria by serving as associate manager. 

BELIEVE IT OR NOT 

Brailofsky and Jaffe Supper Market located at 
Eighty-seventhville, New York, recently, after many 
years of alterations, has revealed its new policy. One 
store will include a "Mechitza" for different clientele 
formerly catered to. Each of them received their 
grocery experience in theix fathers' stores. 



NEW TYPE OF HOUSE BUILT 

Stanley Jaffee, the architect, built a house which 
is bomb resistant, cool in summer, and requires 
little heat in winter. The ex-artist of T. A, went 
to Yeshiva University and afterwards to Columbia 
for his degree in architecture. The house is designed 
in the shape of a basketball. One must go in circles 
before finding the entrance. The diameter is 870 
feet. 



GREENWICH VILLAGE IS DISTURBED 
A CEREMONY 

Norman Kleinman, noted preacher of the vil- 
lage, recently reviewed "Anthology of Poetry" by 
Israel Bassiur. On Sunday, the 20th of December, 
10,000 people watched Mr. Strum eat his hat (as 
he promised once). Police were called to keep order 
Jaffe and Brailofsky Supper Market supplied the 
salt and pepper for the occasion. 



ENGINEER COMPLETES 87th JOB 

Israel's greatest electrical engineer, Aaron 
Schmerler, completed today his eighty-seventh job. 
His success is due to his political pull, the knack 
for which he acquired as president of the G. O. 
of T. A. 

Aaron arrived in Israel by bicycle immediately 
after completing his studies in City and Polytech 
Colleges. 

Only because of his characteristic devotion and 
sincerity, exhibited yet in his high school days, will 
Mr. Schmerler continue his work at engineering and 
fjot stop at 87. 



■ THIRTY-FOUR - 



OKLYN ^im$ 



JUNE, 2038 



ISRAELI CABINET MEMBERS ARE PAINTED! 

The two Israeli cabinet members, Reuben 
Huttler and Jules Nordlicht, have finally agreed to 
teach the country Gemorrah, and have pledged to 
each other, lasting friendship. As a symbol of this 
friendship, the two great duet painters from America, 
Dunie Bruckenstein and Abe Orbach, were called 
from Brooklyn, to paint a double portrait of the 
two Israeli government men. The painting will 
hang in the United Nations Building, in place of a 
broken window pane. 

The two Israelites, Huttler and Nordlicht, 
represent different parties in the government. Ruby 
is known to be the leader of the "Nischt Madlach" 
Party which is against co-education in our parochial 
schools. The other party, led by Jules, "Nudie" 
Nordlicht, is called the "Pinky Party" which ad- 
vocates all non-conformist policies. 

Dunie and Abe, the modern painters, can be 
hired for Bar-Mitzvahs, weddings and graduations. 
Abe is especially known for his Elchanite painting, 
called the "Syncopated Clock when Unwound." 
The other artist, Dunie, Brucky, Abe, or any other 
name you might call him, has painted a picture for 
the Metropolitan Museum of Art, entitled, "The 
Soldier with the Crooked Head." 



No. 0000 



U. S. WINS BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP, 
AND OLYMPIC 

From Moscow, Russia, comes the exciting news 
that the United States Basketball Team led by Leon 
(Wah Wahl Green, his brother Joel (Cliff) Green, 
and the amazing center Dick Weinstein, .has just 
captured the World Basketball Championship frorc 
the Russian Hoopsters. Upon arrival at the Stalin 
Stadium, the team was greeted with a 6 A-Bomb 
salute. The Russians were permitted to foul and 
run ofT-side, yet the Americans managed to w'w 
the game by one point. Dick Weinstein, who playec/ 
an excellent defensive game, (defending himself), 
was almost shot off the court for complaining to the 
referee, Joe Stalin, about a "silly minor point" — tha; 
the Soviets were using 8 men. His teammate, Joe' 
(Cliff), came up with a play entirely new to basket 
ball, which outwitted the Russians. This amazing 
play is known as the "Kazatska Fakel" After the 
three hour game, Wah Wah Green, the team's high 
scorer with 5 points, gave his opinion of the con- 
test by saying: "Betsy — I'm disgusted!" 

A few thousand miles away in Madrid, Spain, 
Joe Brezak of the United States, was breaking the 
World Olympic Record, for lifting dumb-bells. Mr. 
Brezak, a graduate of the Talmudical School for 
Weight Lifters, smashed the record in the following 
way: At twelve noon, Joe lifted ten thousand pounds 
of dumb-bells over his head. They were divided 
into 20 — 'lOO pound pieces. Complaints have been 
made, saying they were Russian made dumb-bells 
and weighed less in the heads. 



- THIRTY-FIVE - 



ACCOUNTANT AND BUSINESS MAN CONFER! 

From the fishy states of New England, word 
is received that the "Fish King" Professor Henry 
Hartman, is now flying to Washington in his Piper 
Cub to confer with the chief accountant in the De- 
partment of Commerce, Mr. Sheldon Kornbluth. 
Professor Hartman, known by his close friends as 
"Hank", has invented a new type of fishing rod, 
by which he claims he caught five thousand skinless 
and boneless sardines, within two days. He is 
also the inventor of a new kind of sardine, that 
come out of their cans easily. For a hobby, Hank 
works as a Tea Taster for the Talmudical Company. 

Mr. Sheldon Kornbluth, the personal accountant 
for the Hartman Concerns, when he is not busy 
with government work, will attempt to get a patent 
on the new fishing rod, by "pull". Shelie, as he is 
called by the President of the U. S., has promised 
to account for every sardine caught by the new 
rod. Mr. Kornbluth, who is known for having a 
good brains for "numbers", is also very good at 
addition and multiplication. He runs a tropical 
fish and rabbit farm . . . 



BASKETBALL SCANDAL BREAKS IN BROOKLYN 

One of the biggest basketball scandals in the 
history of the Brooklyn Borough was smashed wide 
open today by the famous racket-busting District 
Attorney, Bernie Hoenig. The case broke after the 
D. A. waited four years on the Talmudical Academy 
bench to finally arrest a bookie known to the under- 



world as "P. U." The arrest occured in a con- 
verted used-car salesroom, where P. U. was found 
unsuccessfully trying to bribe five T.A. basketball 
stars to throw their Jefferson High J. V. game. 
After the arrest, Mr. Hoenig, a candidate for Go- 
vernor on the Bull-Oney ticket, proudly told repor- 
ters at a press conference: "I always did smell 
something funny about that bookie" . . . 

It has also been rumored that the arrested man, 
P. U., has atempted to hire the renowned criminal 
lawyer, Mr. Avy Weissman, to defend him in court 
against the District Attorney who, by the way, is 
an old classmate of his. Attorney Weissman is 
especially known for his case of Madidaughter 
versus Pabury, where the latter was murdered by 
the former. The attorney won a great victory when 
he succeeded in having the case dismissed, on the 
grounds of a forfeit, since Pabury failed to appear 
at the trial. (?.^?) 



HORN SETS NEW MARATHON RECORD' 

Internationally-known television, radio , and 
movie comedian Gene Horn has just shattered all 
existing records in the "Berle Laugh Marathon", by 
telling continuous jokes in the Talmudison Circle 
Garden for fourteen straight days, with a straight 
face ! The famous star and master of ceremonies 
will be awarded with a tiny chartreuse yarmalkah to 
fit his crew hair-cut, and the long awaited chance 
to shake Bob Cousey's hand. Mr. Horn was given 
his big chance when he started his career on the 
stage of a small theater in New Jersey. . . . 



-THIRTY-SIX- 



NEW K & T AUTO SCHOOL 
OPENS IN BORO PARK 

Ten years ago, this paper announced the fact 
that a new corporation was formed in Brooklyn 
for the opening of a new and advanced teaching 
auto school. Now, we are happy to announce that 
insurance for the original car was granted, and the 
first Kahane and Treitman Auto Driver's School will 
proceed to give courses. Mr. Howie Treitman, the 
business manager and executive, has announced that 
all the 150 trainer cars are streamlined 1935 Chev- 
rolets, and that all the cars are fully equipped with 
a motor and four wheels. The chief instructor, 
Freddie Kahane, has told the reporters that he will 
personally give lessons to the first one thousand 
students. The course consists of four fifteen minute 
lessons for $50. 1) The power and push of a car 
— one pushes in the front and one in the back. 
2) Hints on speeding. 3) How not to turn cor- 
ners. 4) How to shift — from this school to 
another one . . . 



STOCK MARKET REPORT: 
NEW FACTORIES BUILT! 

From Wall Street comes the exciting news, 
that the three President Street multi-millionaires, 
William Kotkes, Norman Liss, and Irwin Pechman, 
have just opened and dedicated three new factories 
on Crown Street, where they are slowly hut surely 
gaining territory. Since each millionaire now has 
a total of 53 block long factories, Washington, D.C. 
was faced with the question of whether to take Anti- 
Trust proceedings or not. It was later decided that 
the three men are very "Trustworthy", and therefore 
action will not be taken at the present. Mr. W. Kot- 
kes, known as Handsome Willie, designer and manu- 
facturer of a new type of nurses' uniforms, held 
dedication ceremonies in his new factory this after- 
noon, Willie's modern factory is especially equipped 



with a special gym, where he can be found 
coaching the world famous basketball team, the 
Centralites . . . Mr. Norman Liss, the Mr. Yeshiva 
of 1951, has built two unique attachments to his 
factory — a gymnasium in his textile plant, where 
he works with his dumb-bells, and a room stacked 
with broken television sets, which he can easily 
repair due to his knowledge of physics acquired in 
T. A. . . , Sir Irwin Pechman Esq. was unable to 
be in Brooklyn today for the dedication of his baker's 
factory, but dedicated it by radio control from his 
Florida plantation, where he is retired at the ripe 
old age of twenty-one 



SCIENCE AND MEDICAL FIELD REVOLUTIONIZED 

Doctor Morton J. Richter, the first graduate of 
the Yeshiva University Medical School, has just 
revolutionized the medical field by his amazing 30 
hour operation, where he replaced the heart of an 
unsatisfied customer with two G. E. flash bulbs, 
and a photographer's time clock to keep up the 
heart beat. After much persuasion, the smiling 
surgeon modestly verified rumors that he performed 
this very delicate operation with his left hand, while 
taking pictures with his right. Ofiice hours are 
between the hours of seven and nine P. M. . . . 

Before this reporter left the University, he was 
led on a personal tour of the Yeshiva Atomic Re- 
search Laboratories, where he was introduced to the 
world famous mathematician and scientist. Professor 
Marvin Bashkowitz. After an interview, the young 
professor hinted that he has finally completed his 
latest discovery — the Y-BOMBl Although he re- 
fused to delve into the effects of this bomb, it is 
believed that the Y is combined with the A (Atomic) 
and H (Hydrogen) weapons, it produces a "H.A.Y. 
Capsule", which, when exploded, exterminates all 
insects by bacteriological warfare it gives them 
HAY FEVER! (It can also be used as a hair dye). 



■ THIRTY-SEVEN ■ 



■r* 










«€" 




■^j 



^ss^^ 






^^smmmi^& 



imxM 



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♦^ AUTOGRAPHS *^ 



FORTY 



^ ^ t% ^i^ 




FALL TERM 



The General Organization 

The G. O. of our school has proved itself to be one of the most competent 
students' organizations during this past year. It has continued its extensive 
program for the benefit of all students. 

An important event planned by the G. O. was the "Chanukah Chagigah" 
when a beautiful program v^as arranged and refreshments were served. Fifth 
term, judged by an executive committee, was awarded first prize for having 
the best song and skit. The club period every Sunday morning has proven a 
success; contest programs were held in each club, and medals given to those 
who accomplished the most. 



■ FORTY TWO . 



In line with its manifold activities, the G. O. has executed the following: 
purchase of hats, buttons, T-shirts with a new Yeshiva emblem, an athletic 
subsidiary which assured the continuance of athletics, assemblies, a new G. O. 
office established above the gym, a new revision of the previous point system 
for service, a newspaper of its own called the "Star", and, most important, 
the initiation of popular referendum. 

All in all, the G. O. saw one of its most successful seasons. Officers 
for the fall term were Aaron Schmerler, Israel Yavne, and Edmond Chanover, 
and for the spring term, Bernie Hoenig, Isaac Sherman, and Nathan Olshin. 

We thank Mr. Strum, the faculty adviser, for his splendid cooperation 
in inspiring the success of the G. O. 



SPRING TERM 





Arista 



The Arista consists of a selected group of students wlio are outstanding 
in their character, scholarship, and services to the school. To become a mem- 
ber, the candidate for Arista is voted upon by the Assembly and then inter- 
viewed by the Arista Senate, a group of faculty members. This year more 
members entered Arista than ever before, and accordingly greatly increased 
its activities. The activities were: a lecture to entering freshmen on different 
school phases, a pamphlet printed on school programs, clubs and their functions, 
and the continuance of the coaching squad for those who were behind in their 
studies. 

Mr. Samuel Leibowitz has served well as the faculty adviser. Officers 
for the fall term were Bernie Hoenig and Marvin Bashkowitz, and for the 
spring term, Leon Green and Sheldon Kornbluth. 



- FORTY-FOUR - 



Student Court 



This organization, which has gained the respect of all students, consists 
of a court of five judges: the President of the CO., Vice-President, and three 
Arista members. 

The court has helped to better cooperation on the part of the students 
as far as school is concerned. It has cooperated closely with the Service 
Squad. If a student, in the opinion of a Service Squad member, has violated 
any of the cleanliness regulations of the school, he was brought before the 
court. 

This season, seventeen cases have been brought before the judges. 
The punishments for those found guilty have been of he nature of suspension, 
fines, and cleaning rooms of the buildings for a certain number of days. 

As is being observed, the rooms are cleaner and the attitude of students 
toward their school has improved. This has happened because the students have 
learned to respect the authority of such a well organized activity. 




FALL TERM 



The Debating Society 

Organized inter-class and inter-sclnool debating in T. A. is under the 
sponsorship of the Debating Society. 

This year, the debating team with its large staff, has carried out a 
system through which at least five members take part in each debate; two 
debaters, one rebuttal, and the newest addition of all, two reference men. 
These reference men assemble information for the speakers. The school has 
shown fine spirit in its attendance and careful interest in the debates. The 
most important and profitable feature of these debating sessions was the 
criticism and suggestions given to participants just before the decision was 
announced. 



-FORTY-SIX- 



The activities of the debating team consisted of four debates. Two 
were with our brother-school T. A. Uptown, and two were with our sister-school 
Central. T. A.'s record turned out to be two won and two lost. 

The topics in the order of which they were debated were, 1) "Resolved: 
Germany Be Rearmed," 2) "Resolved: Universal Military Training Be Institu- 
ted in the United States," 3) "Resolved: The Communist Party in the United 
States be Outlawed," 4) "Resolved: The Federal Government should have 
Control of the Railroads." 

Also, inter-class debating was at its best this year. A new system of 
having two leagues was formed in which each class has five debates. The 
present June graduates who won the championship were awarded beautiful 
debating medals. 

Our two debating managers, Bernie Hoenig and Herbert Leibowitz, 
are to be congratulated for doing a superlative job. 



SPRING TERM 





FALL TERM 



The Service Squad 



One of the most instrumental activities of this past year has been the 
Service Squad. With its influential effect, it has molded the character of our 
students. Working in close cooperation Vi/ith the Student Court, the Service 
Squad has helped to preserve property, institute a system of cleanliness, and 
maintain decorum at assemblies and debates. 

This term, over seventy-five applications were voted on by the G. O. 
Executive Council, until the top eighteen in the school were elected and approved 
by the entire student body. The squad is led by our G. O Vice-President who 



. FORTY-EIGHT- 



presides at all Service Squad meetings. They are on patrol every recess and 
lunch hour in the street, in front of the school, and in every room in our two 
buildings. 

Besides the regular members, the squad has three alternates who spe- 
cially patrol the gym to make certain that all refuse is properly placed in the 
grabage disposal units provided for. 

Due to the Service Squad, the entire school has benefited in that it 
is now more orderly and kept cleaner than ever before. This organization 
signifies one that is ready to aid in the furthering of the standards and ideals 
of the school. 



SPRING TERM 





FALL TERM 



iibrarij 



Situated on the third floor of the main building is the Talmudical 
Academy Library. As the student body has annually increased, the facilities 
of the library to accommodate these students have also grown. The library's 
collection consists of more than 1,000 books. It has a weekly circulation of over 
100 books. There are four important sections in the library at the present 
time: an extensive Hebrew section, a well selected English section, a complete 
reference section, and an edition of every textbook being used in the school. 
The visiting hours have been greatly extended and the library is open now 



fIFTY- 



until six o'clock on weekdays and one o'clock on Sundays. Two librarians are 
on duty every period during these hours. Every student have been made a 
member of the library by filling out the required cards which were distributed 
throughout the school. These have been a few of the many improvements of 
our library for the convenience of the students. 

It is due to the diligence and untiring effort of our newest and youngest 
faculty member, Mr. Abraham Leibowitz, that our library's progress has been 
so marked. His assistant and chief librarian is Gilbert Davidowitz. These two 
have made our library a comfortable and inviting place to study. 



SPRING TERM 





T. A. Athletics 



Yes, Athletics this year has proven to be one of the greatest features 
of all school activities. Its top notch basketball team under coach Hal Jetter, 
for the first time in years had a home court to play on. 

A great event took place when the team won the semi-finals of the 
Jewish Schools' Metropolitan Basketball Tournament. In the finals of this 
great series, T. A. lost to its brothers of Uptown. The entire club and the 
coach were given trophies for their outstanding performance. 

The athletic activities included a Junior Varsity Club sponsored by the 
G. O. under the leadership of Mike Greenfield, an extensive well organized 
program during the Lag B'Omer outing, an intramural foul shooting contest in 
which a medal was presented to the winner, and a punchball tournament. Eighth 
term won the plaque and trophy. 

The two Athletic Managers, Leon Green and William Kotkes, who did 
great jobs, hope that future athletics at T. A. will continue to be inspiring. 



-TWENTY-ONE- 



THE 



AND 



TDRAH 

LIFE 



6/ }UIES NORD'JCHT 




I never cease to be amazed and perhaps a bit terrified at the befuddled 
thinking that a large section of our orthodox Jewry is displaying. This group 
makes a distinction between Torah and life, and fixes definite times for the 
Torah. It restricts its sphere of influence to such times as when Israel gathers 
in the Synagogue and schools during Sabbath and festivals, at mealtimes and 
the like. It leaves many significant areas of life, such as economic problems, 
open to other influences. To this group one may say, "You have violated the 
law," as indeed anyone who fixes a definite time for the Torah violates the law. 
For it forgets that the commandment concerning the Torah applies when "Thou 
sittest in thy house, and when thou walkest by the wayside, and when thou 
liest down, and when thou risest up." The Torah applies to all times. 

To be religious does not primarily mean to pray, although prayer is an 
essential part of religion. Nor does religion mean adherence to the "dinim" 
categorized in the "Shulehan Aruch," although this too is an essential part. Indeed, 
to set aside part of life and to call it religion is in direct opposition to the 



- FIFTY-FOUR ■ 



philosophy of the Torah, as it implies that there is a sphere of life from which 
G-d is excluded. To be religious means to live a life of Torah in every phase of 
life. For instance, a religious worker who seeks a solution to problems con- 
nected with labor in the code of Socialism, and in his capacity as a religious 
Jew conducts himself in accordance with Judaism only in the Synagogue on 
Sabbath and festivals, is a worker who lives a religious life. But he is not 
a worker who lives a life of Torah, however much he may find the Torah 
approximates his Socialism. For when a worker is "also religious," his outlook 
as a worker will take precedence over the outlook of the Torah. The same 
applies to a religious businessman who in matters of business obeys the busi- 
ness code and in private affairs, the rabbi. Here too, the ideal businessman is 
the one who in his business also lives a life of Torah. 

Associated with this is the fact that the classical Hebrew of the Torah, 
has no word for religion. This can be easily explained. Religion in the 
Biblical sense means life itself. The Torah does not use the word religion 
because to the Torah everything is religion. According to our way of thinking, 
the Torah regulates man's entire life in the city and in the village, in commerce 
and in industry, and even the relationship between Israel and the other nations, 
for the Torah is all embracing. We, therefore, may find the answers to all the 
various problems that naturally arise in the course of generations. The Torah 
cannot be said to be "old-fashioned" or "out-dated" since it was written 
thousands of years ago. This divine law, even now, is perfect and when 
G-d gave it lo Moses on Mount Sinai, it was given for all time. If we 
fail to find the answers to the questions that perturb us, it is only because we 
have not labored enough therein. 

If the aforementioned group of befuddled Jewry would only look from 
the Torah point of view and truly get themselves to understand it as if it were 
written yesterday, then the sooner would they realize that the Torah takes 
under its wing all phases and periods of life and no distinction in any way, 
can be made between it and life as we live it today. 



. FIFTY-FIVE ■ 



^msi^ 




Yemenite Jewry 

Its History and Influence on Israeli Culture 



By ZVI SOBEL 



Every week for the past two years, a large Silver Constellation has set 
down at an airport in Israel, disembarking, usually, from seventy to one hundred 
black men, women, and children. Frightened, dirty, hungry, and very uncertain 
as to what the future holds in store for them, these Yemenites, black Jews from 
the tiny Arabian kingdom of Yemen just north of the British protectorate of Aden 
at the tip of the Red Sea, are being flown to Israel at the rate of about one 



FIFTY-SIX- 



hundred each week as part of the plan known as "Operation Magic Carpet", 
which will, in the course of about another year, make Yemen totally "Juden 
Rein". 

In order for one truly to understand the influence that this influx of 
oriental Jewry has had on Israel's political, economic, and cultural setup, it 
Is first necessary for one to have some knowledge of their background and 
cultural life in Yemen. 

After the destruction of the first temple in 586 B. C. E., the Israelites 
went into exile, most of them going north to Babylon while a few thousand 
went south to Yemen. At first, the Jews were well accepted by the heathen 
inhabitants of the land, and found life in Yemen very comfortable. They were 
for the most part silver- and gold-smiths, which trade they carried on up until 
the present time. They dealt also, to a smaller degree, in carpet-making, 
weaving, and pottery. 

With the coming of Islam, however, came persecution and degradation 
to this most ancient of Jewish communities in the world, and they suffered 
terribly until the sixth century, when by some historically unexplained miracle, 
a Jewish king by the name of Dhu Nuwas arose in Yemen. This, needless 
to say, resulted in the betterment of conditions for the Jews of that tiny land. 

From the sixth ta the twelfth century, the Jews of Yemen were com- 
pletely shut off from their brethren in other lands, resulting in the rise of an 
entirely new oriental Jewish culture. 

Whereas in the western lands, the Jews fitted themselves to some 
degree into the cultural pattern, the Jews of Yemen remained a separate and 
completely unintegrcted g.-'oup. An example of this is the fact that the 
Yemenite still practices polygamy, the Yemenite father still reserves the right 
to sell his daughter if he so chooses, and the overall position of the Yemenite 
woman which has not changed to any marked degree since 586 B. C. E. 

After the reign of Dhu Nuwas, there came a long line of oppressor 
kings which has lasted up until our present day. The Jew today in Yemen 
is forbidden to plead any case, civil or criminal, against a Moslem. He is 
forbidden to build a twostory house, thereby causing the Jew to dwell in 



- FlfTY-SEVEN - 



cave-like habitats. The Jew may not ride a horse or a donkey, which would 
imply that he is higher that an Arab. 

The Yemenites have an interesting rationalizatici as to why they suffer, 
one that has taken on the trappings of a folktale. It seems that when the Jews 
were allowed to return to their land and rebuild their temple, Nehemiah, the 
Jewish leader at the time, sent a messenger to Yemen asking his brethren to 
return. The Yemenites, being traditionally silver workers, were very much 
needed in order to restore the Temple to its original beauty and magnificence. 
They refused to return due to the fact that their lives in Yemen were at that 
time free and comfortable. For this great sin, they claim, G-d has been punishing 
them with poverty, disease, and persecution for more than two thousand years. 

In 1910, S. Yavnieli was sent as a "Shaliach" of the "Yishuv" to Yemen 
in order to start immigration rolling to Palestine. The Yemenites were suspicious 
of him at first, saiying he was an agent of the Sultan or a slave trader who 
would brand them as his own the moment they left Yemen. After more than 
a year of speaking and working among the people, his mission was deemed 
partly successful with the arrival in Palestine of some six hundred Yemenite 
Jews. The exodus continued on an extremely small scale with about eigiity 
or ninety Jews arriving in Palestine each year, until 1949, when the Israeli 
government undertook "Operation Mrjgic Carpet," which is now in the process 
of clearing Yemen of its Jews. 

The Yemenite Jew, although miserably poor in the econoTiic sense, 
does not come to Israel with nothing to offer. He brings with him the results 
and products of a unique oriental Jewish culture strangely tinted by the surround- 
ing Arab culture and yet having a distinctly Jewish character. This Yemenite 
influence has been and continues to be felt in almost every aspect of Israeli 
culture and specifically in song and dance. 

The majority of Israel's people are from the western European countries, 
and when they immigrated to Israel, they brought with them the culture of their 
respective sections, including a great deal of musical knowledge and skill. Very 
interesting effects were produced when to the brassy music of these western 
countries were added the soft, haunting woodwinds of the Yemenites. From 



- FIFTY-EIGHT • 



I 



this came such well-known pieces as "El Ginot Egoz" and Ben Zion's "Israeli 
Suite". In the folk music coming out of Israel, there is a marked trend toward 
the lofty Arabic music set off by shepherds' flutes which blend themselves 
beautifully with the graceful dance steps of the Yemenites. Strangely enough, 
the Yemenite influence in the dance has made itself felt through the medium of 
partner dancing. I say strangely due to the fact that among the Yemenites 
mixed dancing is forbidden. Most of the creative dancing is done by the 
women and children, while the men confine themselves to dancing of a 
religious nature. This, however, is not true in Israel, where the dance has 
for the most part evolved into mixed duets and circle dancing. 

In the field of dance, Yemenite women have been responsible for the 
popularization of costume jewelry among the Israelis. It is very interesting 
to note that even if it mean1 nol having enough money to leave Yemen, the 
women would part with their jewelry only with the utmost reluctance. The 
jewelry is usually made of silver or copper and done entirely by hand. The 
emphasis is very much on oval and round forms, set off by jagged edges and 
having a centerpiece of colored stone. 

Another distinct contribution of Yemenite Jewry has been the intro- 
duction oi "falafeh", a gooey, peppery morsel of food that is the Israeli 
equivalent of the hot dog. It is sold by street vendors and one is expected to eat 
it with one's hands. The Yemenites curse anyone who dares to eat his "falafeh" 
with a knife and fork to eternal indigestion. 

There are many, many more Yemenite additions to Israeli culture, 
Vv'hich will in the course of time crystallize and prove that of no small importance 
were the contributions of the world's oldest Jewish community to its youngest. 




-FIFTY-NINE- 



A Lesson From Experience 

By AVRAM ORBACH 

The day seemed pleasant though a bit too lonely 
For the young man on the corner waiting for the bus. 
He had been waiting — Oh so long. 
When a man in his fifties, came along. 

No sooner had they met when in conversation they indulged, 

And the topic seemed to cause the young man to anger. 

" .... is money nothing?"sprung up the youth as if to say that it meant all. 

"Nothing, nothing," said the gent. "Money means nothing — nothing at all. 

"Money, money," the elderly man continued, "I tell you, my son, it's no good. 
For is it not the cause of many a person's suicide? 
For is it not the cause of many a person's murder? 
And is it not the cause of so much hate?" 

The elderly man continued with that calmness and vigor 

While the youth kept on listening with an open ear. 

When all of a sudden a large limousine stopped by for the genf. 

And the young man still stood waiting for the bus . . . wondering. 



-SIXTY. 



7<^ ^(^cfo^e Ti^tden. t^ Desks 



2>ySH^lDOH E. KORNBLUTH 



The class was in an uproar. Sitting in my uncomfortable seat, I looked 
around the room at the aroused students who, seeing the teacher leave, seized 
the opportunity to release their pent up emotions in the typically classroom 
manner. Two boys were arguing in one corner and a third was vainly trying 
to be recognized. A blitzkrieg of chalk and board erasers awakened the few 
students who were still in the depths of slumber and had them join in the bedlam. 

' As my gaze wandered, I saw in a far corner of the room, an interesting 
contest between two boys. Artie Green was engaged in friendly battle with 
Jackie Klein, trying to see who was the stronger. This was to be decided by 
having the first one pinned to a desk, lose the contest. The battle raged 
furiously amid the din. "Come on, Artie" I yelled. "Let's see you do it." His 
only answer was a loud grunt, for Jackie was beginning to force him down- 
ward. With an "Oh, no you don't" he succeeded in escaping the desk and turned 
the tables on his opponent. 

One cannot blame us for acting the way we did, for these wild class- 
room scenes are an ancient tradition. When is it that a boy can show his wit 
or power of brain or body, if not while he is among his friends? It seems 
that this belief was present in everyone's mind. 



-SIXTY-ONE- 



Suddenly a cry pierced the din. "Mr. Pincus is coming. Stop every- 
thing!" As rapidly as firemen respond to a four alarmer, we responded to this 
warning. In the small matter of about three seconds the room was back in 
plaice with its occupants seated as innocently as angels. It was only when I 
heard a resounding thud, as that of a body striking wood, that I glanced to 
the aforementioned corner and saw the two boys still locked in combat. They 
had apparently not heard the warning and only when the door opened did 
they fully comprehend the situation. Immediately, Artie dropped behind the 
desk and Jackie, being caught in an upright position, pretended to be looking 
for something under the desk. After he thought he had convinced Mr. Pincus 
sufficiently, he returned to his seat. The only indication of the previous scene 
was a beautiful red blush on the face of Mr. Klein and the conspicuous absence 
of Mr. Green. 



"I had an important phone call, boys. I'm sure that you used this 
spare time profitably." As Mr. Pincus said this I saw a twinkle in his eye, 
indicating he knew what had happened, but refrained from reprimanding us, 
for at one time he too was a boy. Out of the corner of my eye, I watched poor 
Artie squirming in his uncomfortable position under the desk. Mr. Pincus, 
strangely enough, remained standing and did not commence the lesson as was 
his usual custom. Instead, with an ever so slight smile on his face, he looked 
toward the desk. 



The class could no longer restrain its laughter. Turning in our seats, we 
looked at the desk which by now had attracted more attention than if it was 
painted a bright red. I realized only too well, and I'm sure that Artie was a 
partner to my thoughts, that suspension from class was forthcoming for this 
incident. Artie, making a very untimely decision, decided that he had better 
be found in his seat before the attendance was checked. How was this to be 
done? 1 was dumbfounded when I saw my question answered. On his hands 
and knees, Artie began crawling, creeping, and dragging along the not too 



- SIXTY-TWO - 



clean floor, under the low seats, brushing pairs of legs out his path. By this 
time the class, myself included, had tears in its eyes from continuous laughter 
and, picturing what his parents would say if they saw him now, only brought 
a fresh stream of tears. 

However, Artie Green wasn't laughing. No, he was far from being 
merry. He probably was completely oblivious of what was happening, for he 
seemed to think that his journey was progressing unnoticed. Just then someone 
dropped a book, whether it was by accident or on purpose is still a mystery to 
this very day, and as expected, it landed squarely on the head of Mr. Green. 
Artie opened his mouth as if to cry out, but on second thought he decided he 
had better not do this or his position will immediately be exposed. So Artie 
quietly continued along his way, under seat and desk, praying that Mr. Pincus 
will not notice his absence. 



After his long and arduous task, Artie finally reached the outskirts of 
his objective— his seat. With one last push he managed to place himself 
directly under it. Here was the climax. Would Mr. Pincus see Artie and 
therefore suspend him, or would his endeavor be successful and no one notice 
him? As a cork pops out qf a champagne bottle. Green popped up from the 
floor into his seat, trying to portray innocence on a face that was beet red. 

Then it happened. As he looked up, he found his image mirrored in 
the eyes of Mr. Pincus. The previous red on his face now changed to a pale 
white. He was expecting 4 weeks' suspension. One was able to see the beads 
of sweat on his forehead. "Mr. Green," said Mr. Pincus, as the room suddenly 
became quiet. "It so happens that all your work was in vain. The previous 
commotion in the room must have been tremendous for otherwise you would 
have heard the dismissal bell ring, and there would have been no need for 
so difficult a job as you tried to attempt." Green was shocked, and slowly 
but surely his handsome face lit up in a broad smile of relief. 




1HE BROOK 




By ALAN SCHER 

If we but dare to stop and think, 
How trivial is our life, 
Then we might totter on the brink, 
Of ending all our strife. 

But let our lives be as the brook's 
That flows into the stream. 
Which enters on a river 
That moves on like a dream. 
And flowing into the ocean 
How small the brook does seem. 

Yet were it not for little brooks. 
There would not be a stream. 
And lacking streams and rivers 
How would the ocean seem? 

Thus it is with our shorl- lives. 
As short as they may seem. 
They each contribute a certain thing 
To life's neverending stream. 



IDEAL FRIENDSHIP 



By MARVIN BLACKMAN 

"I am distressed for thee my brother, 
Jonathan; very dear has thou been 
unto me; wonderful was thy love 
for rne; surpassing the love of 
woman." 

We speak very often of friendship. However, many of our supposed 
friendships do not deserve that appelation. The ardent devotion, the intimate- 
ness, and all the emotions that should go into true friendship are missing in most 
instances. In fact, often we find that warm-heartedness for the other person is 
influenced by the friend's possession of riches, or his position in society. The 
actual ratio of true brotherly inspiied associations to sycophantic ones falls 
short of our lowest estimate. 

In my estimation the idea' !^riendship is the one between Jonathan and 
David. If we but make a study of this friendship we soon realize why our 
rabbis refer to it as the ideal friendship. 

When Jonathan saw David upon his return from slaying Goliath, "the 
soul of Jonathan was knit with the soul of David, and he loved him as his own 
soul." This is all that is mentioned in reference to the beginning of this beautiful 
friendship. These few words describe the nature of true devotion in a touching 
manner, the delicate connection whereby two souls become as one. 

What inspired Jonathan that he was willing instantly to forget the 
contrast in rank, a prince and a shepherd boy, and in one moment direct his 
feelings to love David as his own soul? The courage and gallantry, the caution 
and, above all, the modesty which David had shown were qualities which 
pervaded Jonathan's soul. No vestige of envy that David might divest him 
of his military glory found a place in his heart. He became David's life-long 
friend from this moment on. 

In Jonathan, David had a devoted friend— always by his side willing to 
aid him. In him he had a source of counsel and advice; a person in whom he 
could confide and to whom he could fell all his troubles. 

When Saul, Jonathan's father, was hunting and seeking to kill David, 
the latter met Jonathan on numerous occasions and related to hJm his plight. 



- SIXTY-RVE ■ 



Jonathan shared David's grief and did whatever he could to aid him. He suc- 
ceeded on one occasion in alleviating the bitterness of his father towards David. 
He arranged for a reconciliation between them. But the fire which glimmered 
beneath the ashes shoon broke out anew and Saul was once more seeking 
David's life. When Jonathan came to David's aid, again his father refused to 
listen to his pleading and publicly called him a traitor. In spite of this, Jonathan 
persisted in helping and advising his beloved friend. David never forgot this 
and provided for Jonathan's lame son, after Jonathan was slain. 

When David sang his elegy, his grief was great indeed. He had lost 
his dearest friend, one whom he loved with all his heart, a man whom he 
trusted at all times and one who he knew well loved him. His love for Jonathan 
v/as all the greater because it was joined with respect for his noble character. 
David saw in him a bright example of love and obedience to G-d, duty to his 
parents, and loyalty to his king. Even though Jonathan felt bitter against Saul's 
evil behavior toward David, we still see in spite of what Saul claimed, it never 
led him into rebellion and disobedience for David's sake. He was at his father's 
side even in death and died bravely, falling in battle beside him. By this glorious 
act he removed the stain which Saul had placed on him when he called him a trai- 
tor. Jonathan recollected that the conduct of others, whether parent or friend 
or neighbor, is no excuse for anyone for neglecting his own duty or breaking 
any of the Torah's commandments. When David saw his friend setting so holy an 
example of simple obedience and faith, it encouraged him to do likewise. 
For we never read about disloyal speeches or rebellious conduct towards 
Saul on David's part, although he was sorely tried and persecuted by Saul. 

Our rabbis have said that the friendship of David and Jonathan was 
great because it didn't hinge upon material things. They explain this by saying 
that if we become friendly to a person because he has riches, our friendship 
will not endure. Once the man will lose his riches we will have no further reason 
to love him. A friendship will be dissolved as soon as the material factor is 
gone. However, if a friendship towards a person stems from admiration of 
character, that friendship will always remain. 

Now, what conclusions have we reached from the study of Jonathan 
and David's friendship? In the first place we have seen that friendship should 



- SIXTY-SIX - 



be based upon immaterial considerations. It should arise from admiration of a 
person's character and his traits. In forming friendships we should not look for 
personal gains. In looking for a friend we should seek one to whom we may be 
straightforward and unpretentious — one to whom we can relate our joys and 
sorrows — one to whom we can look for advice in our hour of need — and 
finally, one who will help us if he can. 

There are people who claim that a true friend should be willing to 
stand by and help at any time without consideration of whether it is right or 
wrong to do so, and the one who does not do this is not a true friend. This is 
a false premise, as we have seen from Jonathan's example. No one who loves 
us better than he loves truth and obedience to G-d is a, safe friend to have 
or one to desire. If we strike up a friendship we should be sure that the only 
kind of influence exerted on us by our friends would be one of good and not 
require of us to overstep our limits and break the Torah's commandments. 

"When wealth is lost, nothing is lost; 

When health is lost, something is lost ; 
When friendship is lost, all is lost. Anonymous 




\ '%S^^ 



- 5IXTY-3EVEN . 



PEACE 



By HENRY E. HARTMAN 

Bombs and bullets, sweat and pain, 
The men, they die soaked in rain. 
While in the rooms with lights so bright. 
Sit men who ponder o'er their plight. 

The boys they fight and yell and scream. 
While others merely sit and dream. 
United Nations every one. 
They talk of using no more gun. 

Together they sit so hushed and tense. 
Each alone — a man of sense. 
West and East, yellow and white. 
They work clear into the night. 

Speak softly, O you men so wise. 
Can't you halt all these lies? 
For peace the whole world truly craves. 
And for this goal, there lie many graves. 

Bring peace you men of many lands, 
Bring peace to all our tortured lands. 
So men may work and love and say: 
The United Nations have brought this day. 




SIXTY-EIGTH - 



By AVRAM ORBACH 



"Cans't thou not minister to a mind diseased, 
Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow. 
Raze out the written troubles of the brain 

And with some sweet oblivious antidote 
Cleanse the stuff'd bosom of that perilous stuff 
Which weighs upon the heart." 

With these words, Shakespeare's Macbeth addresses the doctor who 
has taken charge of Lady Macbeth. And in reply, the physician answers: 

"Therein the patient must minister unto himself." 

Today, such an answer would not suffice. When one visits a physician 
nowadays, he expects a great deal more than did Macbeth. The mentally ill 
expect an immediate and lasting cure. Any cures existing then were short-lived 
and required that much time be spent in the doctor's office. 

Superstition, prejudice, mysticism and magic, which throughout the ages 
nad been consistently associated with the abnormal mind, have made for the 
slow development of psychoanalysis. If we are finally on the right track to the 
cure of the mentally it is only because man, from the very dawn of history, 
has been interested in the workings of the mind. It is only natural, therefore, 
that some sort of psychiatric knowledge should develop. 

It is possible that the true forebears of psychiatry were those cave men 
who lived thousands of years ago in the region of France near the site of 
present-day Paris. Skulls found in that region show evidence of trephining. 



-SIXTY-NINE. 



which would establish the cave men as the earliest surgeons. But there must 
have been a reason for opening the skull and it is assumed by some scientists 
today that the purpose may have been to release derr.ons which had supposedly 
entered the brain. Some unusually bright witch doctor had probably noticed 
that an injury to the head was frequently followed by strange actions on the 
part of the person who had suffered the damage, thus noting the relationship 
between the brain and behavior. Strangely enough, trephining is one of the 
techniques used today for the purpose of relieving pressure on the brain caused 
by tumors and brain injuries, which may be the cause of abnormal behavior 
in individuals. 



The ancient Egyptians also held to the demoniacal theory of the causes 
of mental illnesses. These they attempted to cure by exorcising the devils 
through incantations and prayers. They later added physical remedies, such 
as prescriptions of certain herbs and ointments, which were supposed to have 
magical properties. 

So we see that mental illness was then thought to be due to the influence 
of supernatural powers. The doctor and the priest were combined into one 
person — the "shaman" or medicine man. When the medicine man mumbled 
his magic incantations— what scientific hypnotism now calls "suggestive com- 
mands"— the primitive imagined that this mumbo jumbo actually drove out the 
evil spirit. 



Hippocrates, the "Father of AAodern Medicine", seems to have been the 
first person to recognize the fact that mental disease was not dissimilar to 
other diseases, that the brain was the center of intellectual activity, and that 
there were different forms of mental disease. While Hippocrates showed the 
way of a more effecive understanding of the mind,, Asclepiades, a Greek physi- 
cian, and Areteus, a Roman physician, prescribed diet, massage, and bathing 
for mental patients. 



- SEVENiy ^ 



While the aforementioned helped in the cure of the mentally ill, the 
names of Pinel, Tuke, Connolly, Reil, and Dix will always stand out as the most 
important in the development of good institutional care for the insane. Their 
contribution of bringing science and humanity into the treatment of the insane 
will never be forgotten. 



The modern era of psychiatry began with the work of Franz Anton 
Mesmer, a young physician who was born in Germany in the year 1734. 
Studying medicine at the University of Vienna, young Mesmer graduated and 
became a physician. Though through the work of this man we have finally 
brought psychiatry to the high standard it has today, the status of the medical 
profession at that time was far from being high. The reader may judge this 
for himself by the title of Mesmer's graduating thesis, "The Influence of the 
Planets in the Cure of Disease." Today such a title would be considered sheer 
bunkum. In Mesmer's time, however, astrological notions were accorded a 
respectful hearing. In this dissertation Mesmer claimed that all human beings 
lived under the influence of the stars, which was being exercised by means 
of a constant flow of magnetic fluid which filled the universe and which was 
transmissible from one person to another. He declared that the equitable 
distribution of this fluid through the human body protected man from disease. 



Widening his theory still further brought his interest to the curative 
properties of magnets and to the cure of patients by "animal magnetism." 
Mesmer believed that by applying magnets to the feet and throat of a hysterical 
patient, the magnet would actually draw the sickness out of the sick person 
and into the magnet itself. He soon acquired a tremendous practice and people 
from all over Europe flocked to his "magnetic seances". But Mesmer was soon 
to leave Vienna, where he had been practicing all this time. A campaign 
agains. him had started and in a cloud of abusive and heated recriminations, 
fie was compelled to go into exile. He went to Paris and experienced, once 
again, a short-lived but enormous success. 



-SEVENTY-ONE- 



That Mesmer produced cures cannot be denied. In fact, sonne of them 
are famous: Dr. Osterwald, a director of the Academy of Science in Munich, 
was cured of paralysis; Professor Baur was cured of blin:!ness, and there was 
a succession of many well authenticated cases vvhere all other medication had 
failed. But the fate of an inventor is seldom a happy one. Mesmer's work was 
new and therefore considered dangerous and objectionable to established 
thought in Paris just as it had been in Vienna. To accept his work would require 
an entirely different outlook. In all fairness to his critics, it must be stated 
that Mesmer's premises were decidedly weak. And yet the fact that he was 
achieving highly unusual cures should have been enough for a scientific inves- 
tigation on a tolerant basis. Instead, he received so much opposition from all 
sorts of groups, including medical ones, that the government officially forbade 
his experiments. 

During the same year that Mesmer fell into disrepute, Cojnt Puysegur, 
a pupil and co-worker of Mesmer, discovered a patient who did not go through 
the painful spasms and convulsive crisis ordinarily associated with magnetism. 
Instead, this patient went into a peaceful sleep. When the patient awoke, he 
was unable to remember anything that had happened to him. On subsequent 
experiments. Count Puysegur found that, in this state of trance, his patient 
responded to his commands and generally acted as though he were in touch 
with the outside world only through the medium of the "magnetizer." 

Although the art was again denounced by science, religion and medicine, 
it had taken root firmly and research went on. 

Eventually, an English physician, James Braid, discovered that hypnosis 
had nothing to do with magnetism. Braid began to hypnotize patients merely 
by having them fix their eyes on a bright object, thus inducing a pathological 
fatigue of the eye muscles, which in turn induced sleep. He found this pro- 
cedure more effective and much more efficient than the roundabout maneuvers 
used by the magnetizers. And a new group of words describing this new 
phenomenon came into being, namely, hypnotism, hypnotic, hypnosis and 
hypnotize, derived from the Greek word "hypnos", meaning sleep. 



. SEVENTY-TWO - 



Once the facts concerning mental disease were known, the way for its 
application was psychiatry's next step. 

■A great deal of today's knowledge of psychiatry can be directly 
attributed to tne worn ui one rridri ~ ur. bigmund hreua. 

Sigmund Freud was born in the year 1856 of Jewish parentage, in 
Moravia, formerly Austria, now Czechoslovakia. Although the family was 
very poor and the expense of schooling high, his father supported Sigmund's 
desire for an education. Taking an early interest in medicine, Freud entered 
the university at the age of seventeen. It was while attending the university 
that he met the full force of the prejudice toward the Jews. This affected 
Freud strongly. As to the influence of this discrimination, he comments-. 

"... These first university impressions produced one very important 
result for the future. I became familiar early with my destiny— to belong 
to the opposition and to be proscribed from the 'compact majority.' 

A certain independence of judgment was in this way developed." 

While still in the university, he worked for a number of years in the 
physiological laboratory of the famous Ernest Brucke, who was his teacher. It 
was here that he made the acquaintance of Dr. Joseph Breuer, a prominent 
general practitioner of high scientific standing. Knowing Freud's interest in 
neurology and psychiatry, Breuer gave him an account of a very interesting case 
of hysteria which he had studied and cured by hypnosis. 

The case involved a young girl of unusual education and talent, who 
had become ill while nursing her father to whom she was very much attached. 
After the onset of her nervous illness, her father's death occurred and caused her 
to become much worse. Dr. Bruer states that when he took her as a patient 
she showed symptoms of paralysis and states of psychic confusion. Through 
an accidental observation, Breuer discovered that the patient could be freed 
from such disturbances of consciousness if she could be enabled to give verbal 
expression to the fantasies which dominated her. Breuer, therefore, hypnotized 
her and urged her to tell him what oppressed her at the time and by this simple 
method he freed her from all her symptoms. The significance of the case was in 
the fact that while awake the patient knew nothing about the origin of her 
symptoms, but once hypnotized, she immediately knew the connection between 
her symptoms and some of her past experiences. All her symptoms were 
traceable to experiences during the time when she had nursed her sick father. 



- SEVENTY-THREE - 



Moreover, the symptoms were not arbitrary and senseless, but could be traced 
to definite experiences and forgotten reminiscences of that emotional situation. 
Although Breuer told Freud about this wonderful discovery, he did not 
publish his findings. Freud could not understand why. The discovery seemed 
to him of inestimable value. In fact, Freud began immediately to apply the 
same procedure with his own patients and was able to verify the results in 
a number of cases. He then urged Breuer to report with him the results of his 
method and in 1893 they jointly issued "Studies in Hysteria". 

However, Breuer's and Freud's discoveries were not received as sympathe- 
tically as the authors had expected. As a result, very soon after the appearance 
of the publication, Breuer withdrew from the field. 

But Freud was convinced that he was right. He continued his investi- 
gations and soon discovered that hypnosis was not necessary in bringing forth 
his patients' unconscious memories. Instead, by having the patient assume a 
relaxed, reclining position while discussing his life's experience, these memories 
became accessible through the free association of ideas. This was to be the 
beginning of the development of the psychoanalytic technique, which is today 
a useful tool in the treatment of neurotic conditions. 

Freud continued his work against great opposition. His theory of an 
unconscious as well as conscious mind was too much for many of the people 
of his time to comprehend. But eventually the Freudian theories became ac- 
cepted and his work drew some of the ablest men in the world. 

Among the men attracted to Freud were Carl Jung and Alfred Adler. 
However, they gradually drifted away and established schools of thought of 
their own. Adler believed that frustration of the desire for superiority over 
others was largely the causative factor in neurotic disorders. Jung supported 
the theory that fears could be traced to the early beginnings of man and 
neurotic behavior could be traced to certain archaic fear patterns. 

Thus we see that modern psychiatry is based on certain foundations 
which are unique in themselves; that it is at once simple and vastly complicated; 
and that this combination of paradoxes has made it one of he most fascinating 
fields of work open to man today. 



SEVENTY-FOUR. 



afi}ji]j]jrF 



FRIENDS OF 



JOSEPH HERSCHMANN 



EXTEND CONGRATULATIONS UPON THE GRADUATION 



OF HIS NEPHEW 



SHELDON E. KORNBLUTH 



ELIAS HERSCHMANN 
LEONARD BERKLEY 

Gallo Wines 

ROBERT E. BRODSKY 
Kinsey Distillers 

JOE BRODY 

Guild Wines 



HADAR WINE 

Cagan Distributors 

GEORGE HEATH 

McKesson & Robbins 

MRS. LILLIAN KEOGH 
JACK KORTIEK 

Gallagher & Burtons 



BEN CHASIN 

Capitol Distributors 



ARTHUR LEVENSON 
Baltimore Club 



HERB FRIEDMAN SOL LIPSKY 

Standard Wine and Liquor Corp. Oxford Distributors 



- SEVENTY-SIX - 



FRIfcNDS OF 

JOSEPH HERSCHMANN 

EXTEND CONGRATULATIONS UPON THE GRADUATION 
OF HIS NEPHEW 

SHELDON E. KORNBLUTH 



YOUNG MOTORS Inc. 

SAMMY WAGER 

1689 BEDFORD AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

BU 4- 4444 



CHARLES LUKAS 

Christian Brothers 



JOSEPH WEISSBERG 

Star Liquors Dealers 



JACK PEARL 

Brown Forman Distillers 



LAWRENCE WENER 
Seagram's 



CHARLES POSNER 

Manischewitz Wines 



AL WOLIN 

Blue Crest 



/,\ARK SCHENK 

Chateau Martin Wine 



■ SEVENTY-SEVEN • 



]3i)l 



// 



afi}Ji)i]jr£ 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 

— OF — 

MR. and MRS. 
SAM KLEIN 



2227 78th STREET 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



■SEVENTY-EIGHT- 



— Compliments of — 
BESTFORM FOUNDATIONS Inc. 

6474 WEST 23rd STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



— Compliments of — 

MR. & MRS. O. HARTMAN 

In honor of the graduation of their son 

Henry 



— Compliments of — 

MR. MARTIN KLEIN 

(0) 



- Compliments of - 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S ORGANIZATION 

BROOKLYN DIVISION 
MRS. JOSEPH G, GREENBERG, President 



SI VLNIY NINE - 



iBB\ 



£iIilJi]J]JT? 



— Compliments to — 

MRS. I. ZBARSKY 

FROM 

MR. & MRS. K. STEIN 



— Compliments of — 
FIRST CONG. ANSHE SFARD OF BORO PARK 



4502 14th AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Dickens 2-3662 



MEYER CHESSIN 

FULL DRESS, TUXEDO SUITS, CUTAWAYS, BRIDAL OUTFITS 

EVENING GOWNS and WRAPS 

TO HIRE and FOR SALE 

455 STONE AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



— Compliments to — 
Beruic Hoeuig 

ON HIS GRADUATION 
FROM 

MR. & MRS. J. JOSHUA GOLDBERG 

And FAMILY 



-EIGHTY. 



i 



— Compliments of — 

MRS. M. JAFFE 



— Compliments of - 



MR. & MRS. MAX LEVENSON 



TO THE CLASS OF JANUARY 1951 



— Compliments of — 

LORBERBAUM FOUNDATIONS 



35 WORTH STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



GARTENBERG & SCHECTER'S 

PIONEER COUNTRY CLUB 
GREENFIELD PARK, N. Y. 
Private Mile Long Lake All Modern Conveniences 

Filtered Swimming Pool 
Private 9 Hole Golf Course Children's Day Camp 

KASHRUTH & SHABBATH STRICTLY OBSERVED 
HOTEL EDWARD, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA -OPEN ALL YEAR 



EIGHTY-ONE ■ 



Ji)5J 



5ifi}Ji]i]jr5 



— Complimenis of — 



S. Fraukel Woolen Mills Corp. 



3 WEST 29th STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



... Complimenis of ... 

Bert & Helen's Candy Shop 

"SERVICE WITH A SMILE" 

BEDFORD AVENUE Corner PRESIDENT STREET 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



GEdney 8-4705 

Boro Fuel Oil Co. 

Metered and Filtered Oils for your Protection 

2 CHURCH AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



EVergreen 6-5441 

Dworetsky Bros. & Lassar 

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 

5406 MYRTLE AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. ' 



— Compliments of — 



Jerome Fischer 



... Compliments of ... 

Mr. & Mrs. Nathan Hausnian 

And DAUGHTERS 



Congratulations to 
OUR SON 

Bernie 



Mr. & Mrs. Moses H. Hoenig 



Congratulations to 
OUR SON 

William 

UPON HIS GRADUATION 

Mr. & Mrs. M. Kotkes 

And FAMILY 



- EIGHTY-TWO - 



... Compliments of ... 

Josepli I. Lesser 

INSURANCE 

107 WILLIAM STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



— Complimenis of 



Mr. & Mrs. Max H. Levine 



... Compllmsnts of ... 

Rogers Theater 

333 ROGERS AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Congrafulations to 

Marvin 

UPON HIS GRADUATION 
FROM 

Mr. & Mrs. Rihack 

8 BILLS PLACE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y 



Complimanis of 



Biirloii A. Silherinan 



... Compliments of ... 

Star Soap Co. 

Manufacturers of 
KOSHER SOAP and YAHRZEIT LAMPS 



304 NORTH 7lh STREET 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



— Compliments of — 



Zelefsky Family 



Congratulations to 

The Graduating Class of June 1951 

from the 

T. A. Baskelball Team 



. EIGHTY-THREE - 



\BB\ 



afiiJi]j]jr£ 



Compliments of 



Mr. & Mrs. Elias Felig 



Compliments of - 



Mr. Samuel Furmau 

1532 50fh STREET 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



— Compliments of — 

Chas. Getzler 

5201 14th AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments ;o — 



Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Horn 

IN HONOR OF THE GRADUATION Of THEIR SON 

EUGENE J. 




Compliments of — 



Mr. & Mrs. D. Spiudell 



Compliments of . - 

Mr. & Mrs. William Schrader 

5100 15th AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



— Compliments to ■ 

Mr. iS: Mrs. Isidore S. Richter 

IN HONOR OF THE GRADUATION OF THEIR SON 

MORTON JACOB 



-EIGHTY-FOUR- 



Greetings to our NEPHEW 
FROM 

MR. & MRS. EPHRAIM KRAMER 



JACOB 5ELIG KRUMBEIN 



GE 8-890: 



Orders Promptly Filled 



GEORGE LEVY'S FOOD STORE 

5023 13th AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



A FRIEND OF 
NORMIE LISS 



... Complim*nlt ot ... 



DIANE, DANIEL, EVELYN MEHLMAN 



MR. & MRS. BENJAMIN NEUGEBOREN 
and Gerrold David 

MR. & MRS. MAX NEUSTADTER 
and FAMILY 



MR. & MRS. JACK OJZERKIS 



SEYMOUR ROME and FAMILY 



SAVOY GARDENS Inc. 

408-10 DITMAS AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



CHAS. SCHATZ Inc. 

V/ALLPAPER 

1S2 1H1500P AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



IRiangle 5-4300 PResident 8-2606 

MARCUS SCHMERLER 

INSURANCE BROKER 

44 COURT STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



MR. & MRS. G. SCHWARTZ 

'.105 16th AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



V/O 2-5800 

ANNA F. SCHWARTZ 

INSURANCE SERVICE 

no V/ILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



MR. & MRS. L. SHORR 

1221 45th STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



SHURAK'S DELICATESSEN 

1596 BEDFORD AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



J35I 



EIGHTY-FIVE - 



afi}ji]j]jr£ 



THE OLSHIN FAMILY 



ESSO PERLA BROS. 

AUTHORIZED SALES & SERVICE 

1550 BEDFORD AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Peretz & Pearl Family Circle 
In Honor of NORMAN'S Graduation 

BEST OF LUCK 



A FRIEND 



Congratulations to OUR GRANDSON 

AVROM WEISSMAN 



MR. & MRS. N. SILVERMAN 
and Family 

57 BRISTOL STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



SILVERSTEIN BUTCHER 

883 NOSTRAND AVENUE,. BROOKLYN. N. Y. 



IKE D. SPIEGEL 
And FAMILY 



Mr. & Mrs. J. Dashevsky 



BU 4-4267 

DUBIN'S BAKERY 

1917 CHURCH AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



NEvins 8-5745 

EBBETS FIELD SERVICE STATION Inc. 

Cars Washed and Lubricated 

1572-1590 BEDFORD AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



MR. & MRS. LOUIS EDISON 



MIRRIAM HARRISON 

On Her Second Birthday 

38 N. CLINTON AVENUE, BAY SHORE, N. Y. 



TR 4-6283 

EVA HELLER ANTIQUES 

382 AMSTERDAM AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 



Treasurer of Yeshiva Etz Chaim 



MR. JOSEPH HOFFMAN and FAMILY 



MR. & MRS. I. C. HORN 
and Family 

RIVERVIE>A' GARDENS, NO. ARLINGTON, N. J. 



MR. & MRS. LOUIS HUTTLER 

In Honor ot the Graduation of their Son REUBEN 



- EIGHTY ;:x- 



ELWOOD HABERDASHERS 

BOYS' and MEN'S WEAR 

5115 13th AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



MR. & MRS. WILL FRIEND 
Mendie, Michael, Abraham 



FEIT & JAFFE 

810 WASHINGTON AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



MR. SAMUEL FURMAN 



Congratulations to 

AARON 

From 

Uncle Irving Aunt Mildred & Mrs. Green 



Compliments of Families 



GREENBAUM, ROSBASCH, & MANDEL 



Congratulations to 

JOE 

From 

Mr. & Mrs. C. Halbfinger & Family 

1402 STERLING PL BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



To 

SIDNEY F. MORTON KWESTEL 

f. om 

Uncle Nathan 



HYMAN & MORRIS LIFSCHITZ 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 

55 WEST 42nd STREET, NEW YOK CITY 



BU 4-4863 

IRVING'5 

Quality Fruit and Vegetable Market 

1076 FLATBUSH AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



A FRIEND 



MR. & MRS. ISRAEL GROSSMAN 

& FAMILY 
1152 52nd STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



DAVID KATZOFF 

CHIROPRACTOR 



KlEiN'S PHARMACY 

888 FRANKLIN AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Belated Congratulations to Our Son 

ARNOLD KNOLL 

Upon His Graduation June 1950 from 

Mom, Dad, & Family 



MR & MRS. ABRAHAM SKYDELL 
.ind Family 

79 ASTORIA A .ENUE, BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



J35J 



cir:uTv.cc\/rM 



!ifi}]i)j]jrs 



MRS. SARAH TEKULSKY 

RETAIL FLOOR COVERING 

36 TOMPKINS AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N, Y. 



ST 3-8787 

TOPS SERVICE STATION 

■TOPS THEM ALL" 

1082 UNION STREET, BROOKLYN.. N. Y.. 

MORRIS TRENK 

Jobber in Hosiery and' Underwear 

90 ORCHID- STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



MR. & MRS. JACK WIESELMAN 
AND DAUGHTER 



MR. & MRS. B. WIESER 



Best Wishes to 

MARVIN. 

Upon his Graduation 

Mr. & Mrs. Weinstein 

Best Wishes to 

AVROM V/EISSMAN 

from 

Mr. & Mrs. Weissmari 
Sister & Brother 



MA 2-9700 SALVATORE GIAMBRONE 

Aa AUTO REPAIR SHOP 

CADILAC & OLDS. SPECIALTY 

1572-90 BEDFORD AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Congratulations ra 

IRWIN PECHMAN 

Upon his Graduation from 
from 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry Adler and Family 



CH 3-7177 

AMERICAN PRESS 

36 WEST 20th STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



ATLANTIC CLOTHING CO., Inc. 

Manufacturers of Men's and Boys' Clothing 
Shomrei Shabos - Non Shatnes Clothes 
1 ALLEN STREET,, NEW YORIC CITY 



LE 4-2550 

BROOKS FURNITURE & CARPET CORP.. 

2247 THIRD AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 



NE 8-2222 

CARROL PHARMACY 

1618 BEDFORD AVENUE, BROOKLYN,. N. Y. 



WE DELIVER. 



ST 3-9376 

CIRCUS BOX 

Tropical Fish, Toys, Dolls,- Tankr 
847 FRANKLIN AVENUE 



S. COOPER. 



SINGER'S APPETIZING & NASHEREL 

393 KINGSTON AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



-EIGHTY-EIGHT — 



— Compliments of — 



H. WOOL & SONS, Inc. 



BUTTER, CHEESE, CREAM AND EGGS 



137 READE STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



MR. & MRS. BEN AARONSON 



BUDOFF FAMILY 



In Honor of 

ABRAHAM BRUCKENSTIEN 

MR. & MRS. I. GORDON & SONS 



In Honor of 

ABRAHAM BRUCKENSTIEN 
RABBI & MRS. L. STERN 



DR. & MRS. DWORETZKY 

1676 53rd STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



MR. & MRS. MAX FEDER 



JERRY'S BIKE SHOP 

Bicycles sold, rented and repaired 
4307 14th AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



MR, & MRS. BENJAMIN KAT2 
And FAMILY 



Besl' Wishes to 

MY GRADUATING CLASS 

from 

NORMAN KLEINMAN 

Eest Wishes to 

HENRY 

Upon his Graduation 
from 

LILLIAN HARTMAN 

Congratulations to 

IRWIN PECHMAN 

Upon his Graduation 



In Memory of my Grandparents 

NATHAN & SARAH SHARASHOFF 



l£)5J 



- EIGHTY-NINE ■ 



£ifi}ji]i]jrF 



Compliments of 



I. BAAS PHARMACY 

DR. JOSEPH BENSON 

DR. STANLEY R. BENSON 

A FRIEND OF M. BERLIN 

BEN'S APPETIZING STORE 

A FRIEND OF JACOB BLAZER 

BLATT'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

PAUL BINDIGER 

BROOKS PHARMACY 

BROOKLYN MUSIC HOUSE 

CANTOR'S GROCERY 

DAVE'S GROCERY 

PATSY DILEIO 

LEONARD ALLEN EPSTEIN 

MR. & MRS. JUDAH FALIK & FAMILY 

MR. & MRS. ABRAHAM GORDON 

& FAMILY 
GOLDSTEIN'S BAKERY 
MR. & MRS. JACOB HALEM 
HANFT'S GROCERY 
NORMAN HARRIS FLORISTS 
MR. & MRS. HARRY HIMELSTEIN 
HODY'S BAKERY SHOMER SHABBOS 
IRWIN S. HORN 
I. G. LAMP MFG. CO. 
ISRAEL MEAT CO. 
JACK'S FISH MARKET 
JAY'S STATIONERY STORE 



JAYNEL'S MUSIC SHOP 

A FRIEND OF THE YESHIVA 

HYMAN KRASNA 

JOSEPH KACKAW KOSHER BUTCHER 

GEORGE LEVY FOOD STORE 

ALVIN LEIFER 

MR. & MRS. R. LEIFER 

KHILATH BNEI ERETZ ISRAEL 

MIKE'S HARDWARE 

PHIL'S "MANORAH" BAKERY 

LOWEN'S BAKERY 

OELBAUM'S BAKERY 

P. & R. SHOMER SHABBOS GROCERY 

PARKWAY JEWELERS 

RADIN'S DELICATESSEN 

MR. RIBOWSKY 

A. ROSENTHAL 

REEVY 

MR. L. SACKLOW 

87 SCHMERLER 

I. SCHWARTZ 

RABBI ELIAS SCHWARTZ 

DAVID E- SHER & FAMILY 

DR. & MRS. HARRY SOHN 

MR. & MRS. LOUIS TOKAYER 

MR. WALLACH 

YOUNG BAKERY 



^^V) 



- NINETY - 



We are very proud to announce the following 
graduate have won State Scholarship this year: 

JRVING AARONSON 

MELVIN S. COHEN 

JUDAH SCHWARTZ 

JOSEPH HALBFINGER 

MARVIN BASHKOWITZ 
JOEL GREEN 



We are equally proud of all those graduates 
that have won these Scholarship in past years 
they are: 



AARON STAVISKY 
ISRAEL STURM 
EDWIN GOLDSTEIN 



1949 



RONALD LANDAU 
RICHARD SILVERMAN 
IRVING GREENBERG 



1950 



ARNOLD KNOLL 
HENRY RADETSKY 
PAUL SALKIN 
OSCAR SCHACTER 



IRWIN SHAPIRO 
WALTER SILVER 
MARTIN SOBEL 
ARNOLD TURIN 



- NINETY-ONE -